NEW YORK (CNS) -- The following are capsule reviews of theatrical movies on network and cable television the week of April 18. Please note that televised versions may or may not be edited for language, nudity, violence and sexual situations.

Sunday, April 18, 8-10:15 p.m. EDT (TCM) "Nebraska" (2013). A road trip mends frayed family ties in this quiet, unassuming blend of comedy and drama filmed in black-and-white. Director Alexander Payne tackles the issue of caring for elderly parents with realism and sensitivity. But, as penned by screenwriter Bob Nelson, his film also includes material unsuitable for most viewers. A grizzled and frail patriarch (Bruce Dern) receives a sweepstakes solicitation in the mail offering a "prize" of $1 million, which he can collect in person in Lincoln, Nebraska — a long way from his home in Montana. His overbearing wife (June Squibb) thinks he's crazy, but his estranged son (Will Forte) is more sympathetic. Seeking an opportunity to mend fences, he sets off with his father on a journey that includes a portentous stopover in Dad's hometown. Amid the salty language and bawdy humor, there are some positive core values and good people on display, along with a celebration of familial love, respect and understanding. Frequent profane and crude language, some sexual references and innuendoes, a few jokes directed at Catholics. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was L -- limited adult audience, films whose problematic content many adults would find troubling. The Motion Picture Association rating was R — restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.

Wednesday, April 23, 5:30-7:15 p.m. EDT (Showtime) "The Words" (2012). This mostly pleasing rumination on moral choices and how the theft of ideas propels fiction eventually lurches to an ambiguous ending likely to please no one. The three-tiered story centers on a struggling writer (Bradley Cooper) who happens across the manuscript of a novel which he publishes as his own work, only to face an ethical dilemma when the real author (Jeremy Irons) turns up. Co-writers and directors Brian Klugman and Lee Sternthal's talky drama is just the thing for those yearning to don tweed and corduroy, sip red wine and discuss literature on rainy nights. Two premarital situations and occasional profane and crude language. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III -- adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG-13 — parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

Saturday, April 24, 9-11:15 a.m. EDT (TCM) "San Francisco" (1936). Robust romantic melodrama set on the eve of Frisco's 1906 earthquake as Barbary Coast saloon owner Clark Gable vies with Nob Hill swell Jack Holt for the affections of opera singer Jeanette MacDonald, with local priest Spencer Tracy trying to safeguard her best interests. Director W.S. Van Dyke II's colorful period piece has a grand cast in a formula plot in which the romantic complications are resolved and ennobled by the quake's destructive magnitude in a finale that still ranks among the most memorable of screen disasters. Not especially suited for children, though enduring, old-fashioned entertainment for the rest of the family. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-I — general patronage. Not rated by the Motion Picture Association.

Saturday, April 24, 8-10:15 p.m. EDT (HBO) "Dreamgirls" (2006). Entertaining screen version of the 1981 Broadway hit charting the rise of a Motown-like 1960s girl group (Beyonce Knowles, Anika Noni Rose and Sharon Leal), and the heavyset lead singer (Jennifer Hudson) they push out of the group when she doesn't match their new svelte image, as well as an R&B singer (Eddie Murphy), and the ruthless manager (Jamie Foxx) who guides all their careers. Director Bill Condon has skillfully refashioned the show for the screen turning most of the sung recitatives into spoken dialogue, and there are especially good performances from Murphy and newcomer Hudson. Despite some flagged material, the overarching themes of loyalty, doing the "right thing," dedication to family and friends and overcoming adversity are key. Romantic complications including adultery, a child born out of wedlock, drug use, crude language, innuendo, mild profanity, some onstage vulgarity. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III -- adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG-13 — parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.