NEW YORK (CNS) — The following are capsule reviews of theatrical movies on network and cable television the week of April 25. Please note that televised versions may or may not be edited for language, nudity, violence, and sexual situations.

Sunday, April 25, 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m. EDT (TCM) "Ship of Fools" (1965). Abby Mann's flawed yet powerful adaptation of Katherine Anne Porter's allegorical novel centers on the foibles and self-delusions of some two dozen passengers (including Vivien Leigh, Oskar Werner, Simone Signoret, Jose Ferrer and Lee Marvin) on a German liner sailing from Mexico to its home port in 1933, the year Hitler came to power. Though producer-director Stanley Kramer is not always successful in giving dramatic credibility to the truncated stories of the numerous characters, he does manage to convey the inability of most to comprehend the Nazi menace as well as to suggest through the narrator (Michael Dunn) that viewers may discover something of themselves in this portrayal of human frailty. Some anti-Semitic references and sexual situations. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. Not rated by the Motion Picture Association.

Tuesday, April 27, 6-8 p.m. EDT (TCM) "The Stratton Story" (1949). Fact-based dramatization of baseball's Monty Stratton (James Stewart), a Texas farm youth who becomes a star pitcher for the Chicago White Sox until losing a leg in a hunting accident, then he tries for a pitching comeback playing with an artificial leg. Directed by Sam Wood, Stewart gives a fine performance on and off the field, with solid assists from wife June Allyson, mother Agnes Moorehead and pitching scout Frank Morgan. Convincing depiction of a successful athlete overcoming the despair of a devastating disability. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-I — general patronage. Not rated by the Motion Picture Association.

Friday, April 30, 8-10:03 p.m. EDT (Lifetime) "Sweet Home Alabama" (2002). High-spirited tale in which a small-town Southern girl (Reese Witherspoon) hides the truth about her previous marriage and humble Southern roots in hopes of marrying an up-and-coming politician whose mother is the mayor of New York City. Directed in breezy fairy-tale manner by Andy Tennant, the movie suggests following your heart and being true to yourself but plays fast and loose with the main character's attitude toward the sanctity of marriage. Some alcohol abuse, mild profanity and homosexual references. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG-13 — parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

Saturday, May 1, 8-10:30 p.m. EDT (HBO) "Tenet" (2020). As he did with 2010's "Inception" and "Interstellar" (2014), writer-director Christopher Nolan serves up a cerebral thriller, a blockbuster accompanied by a heavy-handed science lesson — in this case about temporal mechanics and the possibility of time travel. The mysterious spy agency of the title enlists a CIA operative (John David Washington) and pairs him with a fast-talking partner (Robert Pattinson) to hunt down a crazed Russian billionaire (Kenneth Branagh) threatening to start World War III. Complex and confusing concepts aside, this is a satisfying adventure overstuffed with suave players, exotic locales, spine-tingling stunts and grandly staged explosions. Possibly acceptable for mature teens. Intense violence, including gunplay, occasional profane and crude language. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG-13 — parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

Saturday May 1, 9:45-11:22 p.m. EDT (Cinemax) "Win a Date With Tad Hamilton" (2004). Breezy but slight teen romantic comedy about a small-town grocery clerk (Kate Bosworth) who enters a fan contest and wins a date with her idol (Josh Duhamel), a Hollywood heartthrob who warms up to her homespun charm, and, pledging to clean up his act, decides to follow her back home to rural West Virginia, much to the dismay of her best friend (Topher Grace), who happens to be hopelessly, though secretly, in love with her. Despite its formulaic script and flat characters, director Robert Luketic keeps his adolescent soap opera relatively well scrubbed, avoiding for the most part the gross-out potty jokes and stock sexuality rampant in many teen films. Some crass humor and innuendo, as well as sporadic crude language and a few instances of alcohol abuse. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG-13 — parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.