NEW YORK (CNS) — The following are capsule reviews of theatrical movies on network and cable tele-vision the week of April 4. Please note that televised versions may or may not be edited for language, nudity, violence, and sexual situations.

Sunday, April 4, 2-3:45 p.m. EDT (Showtime) "Alex Cross" (2012). The titular hero (Tyler Perry) of the best-selling crime novels by James Patterson anchors an action-packed thriller, directed by Rob Cohen. Together with his partners — a tough Irish cop (Edward Burns) and a rookie (Rachel Nichols) eager to stand toe to toe with the big guys — Tyler's character, a detective and forensic psychologist, tracks a vi-cious serial killer (Matthew Fox) through the streets of Detroit. The high-stakes game of cat and mouse becomes personal when tragedy strikes close to home, and the investigators' search for justice is tinged by a desire for revenge. Fortunately, the strong violence is lightened by moments of humor, and the picture shows us the tender side to its protagonist, a devoted family man, as well as the role of faith in his life. Intense violence, including torture, drug use, a brief nonmarital bedroom scene with partial nudity, a few instances each of profane and rough language. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG-13 — parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

Sunday, April 4, 10:03 p.m.-12:01 a.m. EDT (Lifetime) "Heaven Is for Real" (2014). After coming close to death during an operation, a 4-year-old boy (Connor Corum) startles his Wesleyan minister father (Greg Kinnear) and choir-director mother (Kelly Reilly) by announcing that he visited heaven and met Jesus — as well as two deceased family members. But his matter-of-fact statements about paradise stir controversy in his family's small-town Nebraska community and, ironically, provoke a crisis of faith for his dad. Director and co-writer Randall Wallace's adaptation of Todd Burpo's best-selling account of his son Colton's experiences is substantial and moving, thanks in large part to the mature way in which it grapples with fundamental issues of religious belief and doubt. A few scenes involving illness and a painful accident might not be suitable for the littlest moviegoers; an unspoken innuendo between hus-band and wife will sail well over their heads. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-I — general patronage. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG — parental guidance suggested. Some material may not be suitable for children.

Monday, April 5, 7-11 p.m. EDT (AMC) "The Green Mile" (1999). Prison drama set in 1935 Louisiana where a death-row head guard (Tom Hanks) comes to believe in the innocence of a huge, gentle Black man (Michael Clarke Duncan) whose miraculous healing powers affect those around him in startling ways. As adapted by director Frank Darabont from the serialized 1996 Stephen King novel, the movie is unduly long but presents affecting character studies of good and evil men with spiritual undertones and a sobering depiction of capital punishment. Some violence including a horrific electrocution, occa-sional profanity and intermittent rough language. The Catholic News Service classification of the theat-rical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was R — restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.

Wednesday, April 7, 8-10:15 p.m. EDT (TCM) "Goodbye, Mr. Chips" (1939). Warmly affectionate, oc-casionally humorous story spans 50 years in the life of a dedicated but stodgy classics teacher (Robert Donat) whose love of learning eventually wins the respect and devotion of students, faculty and the woman who becomes his supportive wife (Greer Garson). Directed by Sam Woods, this tribute to the teaching profession still touches the emotions, largely because of Donat's charmingly low-keyed, Oscar-winning performance. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-I — gen-eral patronage. Not rated by the Motion Picture Association.

Friday, April 9, 5:45-8 p.m. EDT (TCM) "The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter" (1968). Sensitive adaptation of a Carson McCullers story about the frustrated attempts of an an individual who cannot hear or speak (Alan Arkin) to help others. Yet his friendship with a teenager (Sondra Locke) proves not enough to compensate for his isolation in a world of utter silence. Director Robert Ellis Miller successfully treads the line between sentiment and sentimentality. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-II — adults and adolescents. The Motion Picture Association rating was G — general audi-ences. All ages admitted.

Saturday, April 10, 5:30-8 p.m. EDT (A&E) "RED 2" (2013). Those "retired and extremely dangerous" (RED) secret agents are back on the case in this lively sequel to the 2010 film, directed by Dean Parisot and based on the graphic novels by Warren Ellis and Cully Hamner. An ex-CIA agent (Bruce Willis) is adjusting to a quiet life with his kooky girlfriend (Mary-Louise Parker). Before long, he is recruited by his former partner (John Malkovich) to take on a new case and save the world from nuclear annihila-tion. Joining the cause are super-spies from Britain (Helen Mirren), Russia (Catherine Zeta-Jones), and Hong Kong (Byung Hun Lee). While the tone is light and silly amid the mayhem with witty repartee and innuendo, the high violence quotient places this firmly in the adult camp. Frequent but largely blood-less violence, brief drug use, some profane and crude language. The Catholic News Service classifica-tion of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG-13 — parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.