NEW YORK (CNS) — The following are capsule reviews of theatrical movies on network and cable television the week of Dec. 20. Please note that televised versions may or may not be edited for language, nudity, violence, and sexual situations.

Sunday, Dec. 20, 5:45-8 p.m. EST (TCM) "Going My Way" (1944). Bing Crosby ambles amiably through the role of Father O'Malley, the crooning curate sent to assist the aging, crotchety pastor (Barry Fitzgerald) of a poor parish in need of change. Director Leo McCarey's sentimental story is well-paced with humor and songs such as "Swinging on a Star," but at its sugary center is the theme of new ways replacing the old as conveyed amusingly but with feeling by the two principals. The definitive Hollywood version of Catholic life in an age of innocence, the picture retains appeal today mainly as a well-crafted vehicle of popular entertainment. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-I — general patronage. Not rated by the Motion Picture Association.

Sunday, Dec. 20, 7-11 p.m. EST (ABC) "The Sound of Music" (1965). Particularly fine screen version of the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical about the formative years of the Trapp Family Singers in Austria between the two world wars. Its interesting story, solid cast (headed by Julie Andrews and Christopher Plummer), lovely music and intelligent lyrics, colorful scenery and pleasant fantasy will entertain the mind and enliven the spirit. Directed by Robert Wise, the movie has held up over the years as thoroughly refreshing family entertainment. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-I — general patronage. The Motion Picture Association rating was G — general audiences. All ages admitted.

Monday, Dec. 21, 8-9:45 p.m. EST (TCM) "Come to the Stable" (1949). Sentimental but amusing picture from Clare Booth Luce's story of two French nuns (Loretta Young and Celeste Holm) trying to establish a hospital in New England with some help from an eccentric artist (Elsa Lanchester) and a cynical songwriter (Hugh Marlowe). Director Henry Koster gets some smiles from the nuns' adapting to American ways and the bemused reactions of the locals to the newcomers' otherworldly simplicity, with mostly heartwarming results. Unpretentious, generally high-minded fun. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-I — general patronage. Not rated by the Motion Picture Association.

Monday, Dec. 21, 8-10:15 p.m. EST (AMC) "National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation" (1989). In the third Griswold family saga, dizzy dad Clark (Chevy Chase) aims to create an old-fashioned Christmas at home despite his clumsy pratfalls and short-fuse patience pushed to the limit by wife (Beverly D'Angelo), kids, in-laws and other assorted relatives. Director Jeremiah S. Chechik keeps the gags moving quickly past the double entendres and gets some laughs from Clark's bumbling attempts to enjoy Christmas. Some rough language laced with vulgarities and sexual innuendoes. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG-13 — parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

Wednesday, Dec. 23, 10:05-11:45 p.m. EST (Showtime) "Legally Blonde" (2001). Determined to dazzle the boyfriend (Matthew Davis) who dumped her for a smarter girl, a flighty sorority coed (Reese Witherspoon) ends up attending Harvard Law School alongside him. As directed by Robert Luketic, Witherspoon makes the predictable, frivolous film stand out even when the lighthearted "dumb blonde" jokes fade. Some mild sexual references with a smattering of crass language and an instance of profanity. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-II — adults and adolescents. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG-13 — parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

Saturday, Dec. 26, 9-11:15 a.m. EST (Showtime) "Die Another Day" (2002). Stripped of his official agent 007 status, James Bond (Pierce Brosnan) teams with a strong, smart American agent (Halle Berry) in Iceland to uncover the identity of a traitor and thwart a pair of villains (Toby Stephens and Rick Yune) from provoking a nuclear confrontation. While the characters seem more superhuman than human, director Lee Tamahori orchestrates lightning-paced, nonstop action and intrigue with visually impressive imagery. Several brief sexual encounters, much stylized violence and mayhem, an instance of profanity. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was L — limited adult audience, films whose problematic content many adults would find troubling. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG-13 — parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

Saturday, Dec. 26, 8-10:30 p.m. EST (HBO) "Independence Day" (1996). Compelling sci-fi thriller in which huge alien spaceships level three American cities before the president (Bill Pullman), a computer whiz (Jeff Goldblum) and a Marine pilot (Will Smith) mount a last-ditch effort to disable the spacecraft's impenetrable shields. Director Roland Emmerich's patriotic-themed disaster flick is powered by an action-packed story, spectacular special effects and sympathetic characters who provide some human dimension to the proceedings. Intense depiction of massive destruction but little gore, brief sexual innuendo and minimal profanity. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG-13 — parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.