NEW YORK (CNS) — The following are capsule reviews of theatrical movies on network and cable television the week of Feb. 14. Please note that televised versions may or may not be edited for language, nudity, violence, and sexual situations.

Sunday, Feb. 14, 9-11 a.m. EST (Showtime) "RED" (2010). Witty but mayhem-packed spy caper in which a retired CIA agent (Bruce Willis) and his newfound girlfriend (Mary-Louise Parker) take to the road after being targeted for death by a high-level government and business cabal. Their efforts to unravel the conspiracy — and to evade the hit man (Karl Urban) tasked with eliminating them — are aided by a trio of the operative's old associates (Morgan Freeman, John Malkovich and Helen Mirren). Director Robert Schwentke's amusingly executed adaptation of Warren Ellis and Cully Hamner's graphic novel features a refreshingly chaste central romance. But its succession of gunfights and explosions, though mostly stylized, restrict its appropriate audience. Frequent, largely bloodless violence, brief gruesome imagery, a couple of uses of profanity, at least one instance of the F-word, some crude language. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG-13 — parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

Sunday, Feb. 14, 8-11:04 p.m. EST (A&E) "American Sniper" (2015). Sober war drama based on Chris Kyle's 2012 memoir (written with Scott McEwen and Jim DeFelice) about his service as a Navy SEAL during the conflict in Iraq. As Kyle, played by Bradley Cooper, gains a reputation as an expert sharpshooter, he wins the respect of his comrades, but also becomes a prime enemy target with a price on his head. The Texas native's insistence on returning to combat through four grueling tours of duty, moreover, predictably exacts a psychological toll and strains his relationship with his wife (Sienna Miller). Working from a script by Jason Hall, director Clint Eastwood successfully conveys the heroic personal commitment that motivated Kyle to protect his fellow fighters. Yet the film avoids any big-picture moral assessment of the specific struggle in which he participated or of armed clashes in general. Stylized violence with some gore, a scene of torture, a premarital situation, some sexual humor and references, several uses of profanity, constant rough and crude language. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was R — restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.

Thursday, Feb. 18, 6:15-8 p.m. EST (TCM) "The Front Page" (1931). Fast-paced comedy from the Charles MacArthur-Ben Hecht play in which a top Chicago reporter (Pat O'Brien) quits his job to get married, then keeps his fiancee (Mary Brian) waiting after his scheming editor (Adolphe Menjou) tricks him into covering the escape of a convicted killer (George E. Stone). Director Lewis Milestone punctuates the action with the cynical wisecracking of reporters at the city jail while highlighting the battle between the crafty editor and his shrewd reporter, with hilarious results despite the poor quality of the soundtrack. Stylized violence, sexual innuendo and comic cynicism. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. Not rated by the Motion Picture Association.

Saturday, Feb. 20, 8-10:05 p.m. EST (HBO) "Argo" (2012). Engrossing thriller, based on real events, and set against the backdrop of the Iran hostage crisis of 1979-81. Tasked by his boss (Bryan Cranston) with rescuing the handful of U.S. embassy employees who managed to escape capture when that facility was overrun by armed militants, a CIA agent (Ben Affleck) hatches a seemingly far-fetched scheme: He'll smuggle them out of Tehran — where they've been hiding in the Canadian embassy — disguised as a Canadian film crew scouting locations. To do so convincingly, he enlists the aid of a Hollywood producer (Alan Arkin) and makeup artist (John Goodman), and together they drum up publicity for the imaginary film project of the title. Affleck, who also directed, masterfully alternates between life-or-death drama and high-stakes humor. Though both aspects of the story too frequently give rise to coarse dialogue, the canny patriotism and emotional impact of the picture — as scripted by Chris Terrio — make for a rousing experience. Potentially disturbing scenes and images, an abortion reference, a half-dozen uses of profanity, many rough and crude terms. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was R — restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.

Saturday, Feb. 20, 8-11 p.m. EST (AMC) "12 Strong" (2018). True military adventures don't come any more rousing than this. Chris Hemsworth plays a Green Beret captain leading a small Special Forces unit on horseback in rugged terrain in the early weeks of fighting in Afghanistan after 9/11. Director Nicolai Fuglsig, working from a script by Ted Tally and Peter Craig, avoids what could have become flag-waving jingoistic moments, preferring to show the Americans quietly going about their tasks. Intense, lengthy and realistic combat violence and gore, a scene of the execution of a teacher in front of three young girls. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was R — restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.