NEW YORK (CNS) — The following are capsule reviews of theatrical movies on network and cable television the week of Feb. 21. Please note that televised versions may or may not be edited for language, nudity, violence, and sexual situations.

Sunday, Feb. 21, 6:30-9 p.m. EST (AMC) "Now You See Me" (2013). A quartet of professional magicians (Jesse Eisenberg, Woody Harrelson, Dave Franco and Isla Fisher) is caught in a high-stakes game of cat and mouse in this entertaining caper film directed by Louis Leterrier. Brought together by a mysterious capitalist (Michael Caine), the four become a world-famous act. But one outrageous stunt they manage to pull off — a long-distance and very public bank robbery — attracts the attention of an FBI agent (Mark Ruffalo), his Interpol counterpart (Melanie Laurent) and a reality show host (Morgan Freeman) whose mission is to expose the secrets of the trade. Though it contains a slightly disturbing pagan element, in the end, Leterrier's film is a harmless and witty romp for grown-ups, yet one that lingers in the memory no longer than the time required to shout, "Abracadabra!" Mild action violence, a vulgar gesture, sexual innuendo, some crude and profane language. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG-13 — parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

Sunday, Feb. 21, 8-11:04 p.m. EST (A&E) "The Magnificent Seven" (2016). After a ruthless gold-mining mogul (Peter Sarsgaard) uses his private army of thugs to slaughter several inhabitants of a frontier town in cold blood, and threatens the survivors with a similar fate unless they sell their land to him for a pittance, the widow (Haley Bennett) of one of his victims hires a roving lawman (Denzel Washington) to organize resistance. The result is a motley band of skilled gunmen (most prominently Chris Pratt and Ethan Hawke) and an extended shoot-'em-up showdown. At once violent and somewhat thoughtful, director Antoine Fuqua's jaunty western, the remake of a 1960 film that was itself an adaptation of Akira Kurosawa's "Seven Samurai" from 1954, pauses occasionally to reflect on the dividing line between justice and vengeance. It also features Christian references and imagery as well as examples of devotion ranging from the sincere to the eccentric. Though it's a chivalrous parable that presents Catholic theology's just-war theory in microcosm and showcases self-sacrificing heroism, its pervasive mayhem will nonetheless seem unjustified to some. Constant stylized violence with gunplay and explosions but very little blood, several uses of profanity, a couple of mild oaths, numerous crude and crass expressions. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG-13 — parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

Monday, Feb. 22, 5:30-7:30 p.m. EST (Showtime) "On the Basis of Sex" (2018). This legal drama proves that even though a tax case may be destined to serve as a landmark for equal treatment under the law — as well as a breakthrough for future Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg (Felicity Jones) — in the absence of compelling dialogue or performances, it's nearly impossible to keep stodginess at bay. Director Mimi Leder and screenwriter Daniel Stiepleman (Ginsburg's nephew) have ameliorated the deficiencies somewhat through discussions of legal morality. And Ginsburg's record as a wife and mother, nursing her husband (Armie Hammer) through a cancer scare, attending his law school classes as well as her own and later raising a son and a daughter, is undeniably impressive. But the film is an unapologetically heroic narrative that lacks only a college fight song to pump up emotion at its conclusion. Possibly acceptable for mature adolescents, though they're likely to regard this profile more as a homework assignment than a piece of entertainment. A scene of marital sensuality, at least one use of profanity, a couple of milder oaths, a single rough and several crude terms. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG-13 — parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

Wednesday, Feb. 24, 10 p.m.-midnight EST (TCM) "A Soldier's Story" (1984). When a black sergeant (Adolph Caesar) is murdered at an Army camp in 1944, the investigating officer (Howard Rollins Jr.) discovers that the victim was a ruthless tyrant who had been well-hated by his men. Director Norman Jewison's fine production looks at racial prejudice from a number of perspectives with unusually effective results. Some violence and rough language. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-II — adults and adolescents. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG — parental guidance suggested. Some material may not be suitable for children.

Saturday, Feb. 27, 3:30-5:45 p.m. EST (TCM) "A Man for All Seasons" (1966). Engrossing drama of the last seven years in the life of Thomas More, Henry VIII's chancellor, who met a martyr's death rather than compromise his conscience during a period of religious turmoil. Robert Bolt's script is masterfully directed by Fred Zinnemann, with a standout performance by Paul Scofield in the title role, among other notable performances from a uniformly fine cast. The historical dramatization achieves an authentic human dimension that makes its 16th-century events more accessible and its issues more universal. Profoundly entertaining but heavy going for children. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-I — general patronage. The Motion Picture Association rating was G — general audiences. All ages admitted.