NEW YORK (CNS) — The following are capsule reviews of theatrical movies on network and cable television the week of Jan. 10. Please note that televised versions may or may not be edited for language, nudity, violence, and sexual situations.

Sunday, Jan. 10, 5-8 p.m. EST (AMC) "Space Cowboys" (2000). Enjoyable action-adventure flick about four retired Air Force pilots (Clint Eastwood, Tommy Lee Jones, James Garner and Donald Sutherland) sent into space 40 years past their prime because only their technical knowledge can stop a malfunctioning Russian satellite from smashing into Earth. While the narrative's plausibility is questionable, director Eastwood's casually paced film maintains interest with colorful characters, impressive visual effects and slight intrigue as well as an unexpected conclusion. Brief menace with intermittent crass language and some profanity. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-II — adults and adolescents. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG-13 — parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

Monday, Jan. 11, 8-10:15 p.m. EST (TCM) "The Four Feathers" (1939). When his regiment is ordered to join Kitchener's 1895 campaign to recapture Khartoum, an officer (John Clements) resigns his commission, thereby earning white feathers of cowardice from three comrades (Ralph Richardson among them) and his fiancee (June Duprez). How he redeems them by aiding his friends in Sudan disguised as a native makes an exciting but far-fetched adventure directed by Zoltan Korda with much spectacle, some good humor (notably C. Aubrey Smith's account of "the thin red line" at Balaclava) and no little flag-waving. Assorted stylized violence, but for a higher purpose than imperialism. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-I — general patronage. Not rated by the Motion Picture Association.

Tuesday, Jan. 12, 8-11 p.m. EST (ABC) "Captain America: The Winter Soldier" (2014). The big guy with the red, white and blue shield returns to save the planet in this rousing follow-up to 2011's "Captain America: The First Avenger," and 2012's "The Avengers." The director (Samuel L. Jackson) of an international crime-fighting bureau discovers the agency has been compromised from within by one of his fellow leaders (Robert Redford). He turns to Captain America (Chris Evans) and his sidekicks, Black Widow (Scarlett Johansson) and Falcon (Anthony Mackie), to unravel the conspiracy that threatens world peace and freedom. But first they must defeat the baddies, led by the Winter Soldier (Sebastian Stan), whom Captain America seems to have met before. This popcorn movie, directed by brothers Anthony and Joe Russo, is sure to please fans of the Marvel Comics superhero with its patriotic, gung-ho tone and grandiose action sequences (which may be too intense for younger viewers). Screenwriters Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely, who penned the first Captain America script, expand their horizons with a smart and timely story touching on national security, government surveillance and the price of freedom. Intense but largely bloodless violence, including gunplay. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-II — adults and adolescents. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG-13 — parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

Tuesday, Jan. 12, 9:45-11:30 p.m. EST (TCM) "The Mark of Zorro" (1940). Dashing tale of Old California in which a well-bred caballero (Tyrone Power) turns bandit in order to free Los Angeles from its greedy governor (J. Edward Bromberg) and his ruthless military commander (Basil Rathbone). Directed by Rouben Mamoullian, the period action piece is strikingly photographed with Power easy to take as the Spanish Robin Hood masquerading as a foppish dandy. Some stylized violence and mild romance. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-II — adults and adolescents. Not rated by the Motion Picture Association.

Thursday, Jan. 14, 8-10:03 p.m. EST (Lifetime) "Sleeping with the Enemy" (1991). When a psychotically jealous husband (Patrick Bergin) discovers his abused wife (Julia Roberts) has faked her own death to escape him, he tracks her down and finds her in the arms of her new love (Kevin Anderson). Director Joe Ruben's sleek thriller efficiently creates suspense by making full use of Robert's beautifully played vulnerability but falters with a needless cliche at the end. Some violence, a restrained marital encounter and minimal rough language. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was R — restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.

Saturday, Jan. 16, 10:45 a.m.-12:45 p.m. EST (Showtime) "WarGames" (1983). Good teen suspense thriller in which a high school computer whiz (Matthew Broderick) breaks into a government nuclear-strategy computer and starts playing a war game, the logical conclusion of which is nuclear Armageddon. Directed by John Badham, the story loses much of its momentum when the military program's designer (John Wood) is tracked down and points out the just desserts of human folly just before the slack conclusion. A few vulgar expletives. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-II — adults and adolescents. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG — parental guidance suggested. Some material may not be suitable for children.

Saturday, Jan. 16, 10:20-11:57 p.m. EST (Cinemax) "Going in Style" (2017). Leaden comedy about a trio of retirees (Morgan Freeman, Michael Caine and Alan Arkin) driven to desperation by financial woes who cook up an unlikely scheme to rob a branch of the bank they blame for the cancellation of their pensions. As they get tips for a successful caper from an experienced criminal (John Ortiz), Arkin's grouchy character finds romance with a grocery store checkout lady (Ann-Margret). Director Zach Braff's remake of Martin Brest's 1979 film — which also features Matt Dillon as an FBI agent — amounts to a complete waste of its cast's considerable gifts. While not a movie from which viewers are likely to draw any real-life moral conclusions, it does present the oldsters' actions as justified and ultimately harmless. A frivolous treatment of crime, including drug use, a couple of brief premarital bedroom scenes, a scatological sight gag, about a half-dozen uses of profanity, some vulgar sexual references, a single instance of rough language, considerable crude and crass talk. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG-13 — parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.