NEW YORK (CNS) — The following are capsule reviews of theatrical movies on network and cable television the week of Jan. 17. Please note that televised versions may or may not be edited for language, nudity, violence, and sexual situations.

Sunday, Jan. 17, 10:10 p.m.-12:15 a.m. EST (AMC) "The Incident" (1967). Dynamic social drama about a group of passengers riding the New York subway late at night and being terrorized by two hoodlums (Tony Musante and Martin Sheen). Tautly directed by Larry Peerce, it is not a pleasant story, but gripping and thought-provoking. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was L — limited adult audience, films whose problematic content many adults would find troubling. Not rated by the Motion Picture Association.

Tuesday, Jan. 19, 8-10 p.m. EST (ABC) "Cinderella" (2015). Director Kenneth Branagh's exuberant live-action retelling of this oft-filmed fable injects vibrant new life into a venerable fairy tale. He sticks to the basic story and its iconic characters: sunny Cinderella (Lily James), her beloved but soon-deceased parents (Hayley Atwell and Ben Chaplin), her wicked stepmother (Cate Blanchett) and ghastly stepsisters (Sophie McShera and Holliday Grainger) as well as the charming prince (Richard Madden) and kindly fairy godmother (Helena Bonham Carter) who eventually rescue the put-upon orphan from her misery. A delightful fantasy for the entire family, Branagh's affectionate take, at once familiar and fresh, nicely brings to the forefront dual lessons about compassion and forgiveness. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-I — general patronage. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG — parental guidance suggested. Some material may not be suitable for children.

Thursday, Jan. 21, 7:15-9 p.m. EST (Showtime) "Alex Cross" (2012). The titular hero (Tyler Perry) of the best-selling crime novels by James Patterson anchors an action-packed thriller, directed by Rob Cohen. Together with his partners — a tough Irish cop (Edward Burns) and a rookie (Rachel Nichols) eager to stand toe to toe with the big guys — Tyler's character, a detective and forensic psychologist, tracks a vicious serial killer (Matthew Fox) through the streets of Detroit. The high-stakes game of cat and mouse becomes personal when tragedy strikes close to home, and the investigators' search for justice is tinged by a desire for revenge. Fortunately, the strong violence is lightened by moments of humor, and the picture shows us the tender side to its protagonist, a devoted family man, as well as the role of faith in his life. Intense violence, including torture, drug use, a brief nonmarital bedroom scene with partial nudity, a few instances each of profane and rough language. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG-13 — parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

Thursday, Jan. 21, 8-9:30 p.m. EST (TCM) "The Richest Girl in the World" (1934). Eccentric romantic comedy in which an heiress (Miriam Hopkins) changes places with her private secretary (Fay Wray) in order to test the real intentions of a would-be suitor (Joel McCrea). Director William A. Seiter keeps the implausible situations light and mostly fun, with a fine cast making all the duplicity seem almost credible. Sexual situations. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. Not rated by the Motion Picture Association.

Friday, Jan. 22, 5:05-6:30 p.m. EST (Showtime) "Waiting for Guffman'' (1997). Minor comedy set in a fictional Missouri city where a temperamental director (Christopher Guest) attempts to stage what he hopes will be a Broadway-bound musical, despite the dubious talents of his amateur cast (including Catherine O'Hara, Parker Posey and Eugene Levy). Also directed by Guest, the movie is done in documentary style, using the conventions of filming a story within a story to bring out the subtle humor of ordinary folk getting caught up in aggrandizing their 15 minutes of fame. Some crude sexual references and a few instances of rough language. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was R — restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.

Friday, Jan. 22, 8-11 p.m. EST (AMC) "Star Trek" (2009). Exhilarating prequel to the "Star Trek" franchise as the youthful rabble-rousing James Tiberius Kirk (Chris Pine) forgoes his delinquent ways to join the crew of the Starship Enterprise — including Leonard "Bones" McCoy (Karl Urban), Uhura (Zoe Saldana), Sulu (James Cho) and Chekhov (Anton Yelchin) — where he soon clashes with rival Spock (Zachary Quinto) until they unite against the vengeful Romulan Nero (Eric Bana), intent on destruction. Director J.J. Abrams breathes new life into the series by skillfully balancing the well-executed action sequences with an absorbing human story, leavened with humor and optimism, and likable characters you care about, though some brief gratuitous sexuality and the use of several expletives restrict this to mature teens and up. Intense but not graphic action violence, a short but frisky bedroom scene with skimpy attire, some crude language and a single profanity, The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG-13 — parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

Saturday, Jan. 23, 4-6 p.m. EST (Lifetime) "Sister Act" (1992). Having witnessed a mob rubout, a Reno lounge singer (Whoopi Goldberg) hides out in a cloistered San Francisco convent disguised as a nun and horrifies the mother superior (Maggie Smith) by turning their choir into a local sensation and getting the nuns involved in their neighborhood. Director Emile Ardolino parlays Goldberg's sassiness into a lively comedy that treats nuns both as comic figures and spirited, caring individuals with a positive lifestyle. References to an extramarital affair and brief comic violence. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG — parental guidance suggested. Some material may not be suitable for children.

Saturday, Jan. 23, 8-9:45 p.m. EST (HBO) "Don't Let Go" (2019). After his niece (Storm Reid), with whom he shared a close relationship, is murdered, a police detective (David Oyelowo) is startled to receive a series of phone calls from her. Eventually piecing together the fact that she is communicating with him from a different time period — two weeks before her death — he works with her to prevent the fatal crime from ever taking place. Initially intriguing but ultimately illogical, director and co-writer Jacob Estes' thriller becomes unmanageably complex, confusing and implausible. While underlying values are sound, bloody images and vulgar talk suggest an older audience. Considerable violence and gore, a narcotics theme, a couple of mild oaths, a few rough and several crass terms. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was R — restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.