NEW YORK (CNS) — The following are capsule reviews of theatrical movies on network and cable television the week of Jan. 2. Please note that televised versions may or may not be edited for language, nudity, violence and sexual situations.

Sunday, Jan. 2, 9-11 p.m. EST (AMC) "Men in Black" (1997). Zany sci-fi comedy in which a brassy New York City cop (Will Smith) is recruited by a taciturn government agent (Tommy Lee Jones) who monitors extraterrestrial activity in the city to prevent a ferocious alien in human disguise from destroying Earth. Director Barry Sonnenfeld's apt pairing of Smith and Jones mixes understated hip humor with witty creature puppetry and amusing special effects. Some cartoonlike comic violence and a few instances of profanity. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG-13 — parents are strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13. (Followed by the sequels "Men in Black II" (2002) 11p.m.-1 a.m. EST and "Men in Black 3" (2012) 1-3:30 a.m. EST Monday, Jan. 3)

Friday, Jan. 7, 8-11 p.m. EST (AMC) "Midway" (2019). Vivid fact-based epic recounting the period from the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, on Dec. 7, 1941, to the Navy's decisive victory in the battle of the title in June 1942, a triumph that turned the tide in the Pacific Theater of World War II. The ensemble drama follows, among others, top brass, including Adms. Chester W. Nimitz (Woody Harrel-son), William "Bull" Halsey (Dennis Quaid) and Isoroku Yamamoto (Etsushi Toyokawa), a brilliant in-telligence officer (Patrick Wilson), two daring pilots (Ed Skrein and Luke Evans) and Lt. Col. Jimmy Doolittle (Aaron Eckhart) whose air raid on Tokyo in April 1942 was a major propaganda coup for the Allies and helped lay the groundwork for the positive outcome at sea less than two months later. As this partial list suggests, director Roland Emmerich has a lot of personal story lines to keep bound together with the result that the details of his film are sometimes confusing. But there's a good balance in Wes Tooke's script between action scenes and human interest and the patriotism, courage and tenacity on display go a long way to maintain attention. Possibly acceptable for older teens despite a lot of realistic sailors' talk. Frequent stylized violence with little gore, brief gruesome images of a burned corpse, about 10 uses of profanity, an equal number of milder oaths, at least one rough term, considerable crude and crass language. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG-13 — parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

Saturday, Jan. 8, noon-2:30 p.m. EST (TCM) "The Adventures of Mark Twain" (1944). Interesting piece of Americana follows Twain's life as Mississippi riverboat pilot, Western prospector, newspaper report-er, popular humorist and acclaimed author. Irving Rapper directs Fredric March in a quite winning performance as the irascible humbug of the title, with Alexis Smith as his cherished wife whose early death devastates the man and darkens his writing. Idealized view of Twain's life provides satisfying, meaningful entertainment. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-I — general patronage. Not rated by the Motion Picture Association.

Saturday, Jan. 8, 8-10 p.m. EST (Cinemax) "My Cousin Vinny" (1992). Tough-talking comedy has New York college students Ralph Macchio and Mitchell Whitfield improbably charged with murder in the Deep South, then defended by rookie Brooklyn, New York, lawyer Joe Pesci with a little help from girl-friend Marisa Tomei. Relying on blue-collar and Southern stereotypes, director Jonathan Lynn fashions a fitfully funny, fish-out-of-water courtroom comedy. Much rough language, a few double entendres and an implied premarital relationship. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was R — restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.