NEW YORK (CNS) — The following are capsule reviews of theatrical movies on network and cable television the week of Jan. 24. Please note that televised versions may or may not be edited for language, nudity, violence and sexual situations.

Sunday, Jan. 24, 5:30-8 p.m. EST (A&E) "The Wolverine" (2013). Macho superhero adventure in which the titular character (Hugh Jackman) — whose distinctive gifts include tougher-than-steel claws that sprout from his hands — slices and dices his way through Japan while protecting the heiress (Tao Okamoto) to an old friend's (Haruhiko Yamanouchi) industrial fortune. Physical and emotional angst make director James Mangold's action picture — based on Marvel's X-Men mythos — a heavy lift for casual viewers. Still, the relentless combat involves only moderate gore, and occasional flashes of wit offer some relief from the fog of testosterone. Constant action violence with some blood, ritual suicides, a nonmarital bedroom scene, rear nudity, mature references, at least one use of the F-word, occasional crude and crass language. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG-13 — parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

Monday, Jan. 25, 8-9:45 p.m. EST (TCM) "Criss Cross" (1949). Dark crime caper in which an armored car driver (Burt Lancaster) joins a mobster (Dan Duryea) in a payroll robbery by which the poor sap hopes to win back the mobster's double-crossing girlfriend (Yvonne De Carlo). Director Robert Siodmak deftly meshes a twisty crime plot with a brooding romantic triangle detailing the destruction of a man blinded by his obsession for a manipulative woman. Some stylized violence and heavy sexual innuendo. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. Not rated by the Motion Picture Association.

Wednesday, Jan. 27, 7-9 p.m. EST (Showtime) "Twilight" (2008). Gothic romance about a self-possessed high school student (Kristen Stewart) who moves to Washington state to live with her divorced father (Billy Burke) and falls for a mysterious classmate (Robert Pattinson) who turns out to be a vampire. Though set against a lush, misty background, director Catherine Hardwicke's stylish screen version of Stephenie Meyer's best-selling 2005 novel for young adults never takes itself too seriously, as the conflicted central relationship — restrained by the gentlemanly bloodsucker's scruples — parodies both adolescent awkwardness and teenage yearning. Brief but intense action violence, a scene of mild sensuality and a few sexual references; acceptable for older teens. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-II — adults and adolescents. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG-13 — parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13. (Followed, in order of their release, by the four other films in the franchise 9 p.m.-5:15 a.m. Thursday, Jan. 28)

Friday, Jan. 29, 5:45-8 p.m. EST (TCM) "The Yearling" (1946). A young boy's attachment to an orphaned fawn relieves the loneliness of life in the Florida wilderness but brings grief as the deer grows to threaten the family's crops in this classic version of the Marjorie Kinnon Rawlings story. With credible performances by Gregory Peck and Jane Wyman as the parents and Claude Jarman Jr. as the youth, director Clarence Brown has fashioned a genuine portrait of rural American life as well as a sincere celebration of family values. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-I — general patronage. The Motion Picture Association rating was G — general audiences. All ages admitted.

Saturday, Jan. 30, 8-9:45 p.m. EST (Cinemax) "Stand and Deliver" (1988). Quietly affecting movie about an extraordinary real-life math teacher (Edward James Olmos) in an East Los Angeles high school who transforms a rowdy class of Hispanics into calculus whiz kids. When test administrators question his students' high grades, the teacher fights back with charges of discrimination. Inspiring story, fine acting by the leads and deft direction by Ramon Menendez. Some profanity in a realistic context. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-II — adults and adolescents. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG — parental guidance suggested. Some material may not be suitable for children.

Saturday, Jan. 30, 8-10:05 p.m. EST (HBO) "The Mummy" (1999). Spirited horror adventure set in 1920s Egypt where a treasure hunting Yank (Brendan Fraser) and an archaeological librarian (Rachel Weisz) inadvertently revive a 3,000-year-old mummy (Arnold Vosloo) whose evil powers of destruction seemingly know no bounds. Writer-director Stephen Sommers stuffs the lavishly shot action movie with spooky special effects and a comical tone that generally adds up to rousing, old-fashioned entertainment. Recurring stylized violence, and fleeting partial nudity. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG-13 — parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13. (Followed by the sequel "The Mummy Returns" (2001) 10:05 p.m.-12:15 a.m. EST)

Saturday, Jan. 30, 9-11 p.m. EST (Showtime) "Burden" (2020). Uplifting fact-based conversion story in which a veteran Ku Klux Klan member (Garrett Hedlund) falls for a more enlightened single mother (Andrea Riseborough) who eventually demands that he choose between his racist pals and his relationship with her. As he struggles with the consequences of renouncing his allegiance to the local Klan leader (Tom Wilkinson), whom he has long regarded as a father figure, he comes under the healing influence of an African American minister (Forest Whitaker). Writer-director Andrew Heckler’s drama is rich in such Gospel values as repentance, forgiveness, hope and the rejection of violence. Though strictly for grownups who can tolerate foul dialogue, including nasty epithets, it’s ultimately an inspiring reminder of the power of longsuffering, courageous charitable love. Scenes of stylized violence, including beatings, cohabitation, a scatological incident, about a half-dozen profanities, a couple of milder oaths, constant rough and much crude and crass language. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was R — restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.