NEW YORK (CNS) — The following are capsule reviews of theatrical movies on network and cable television the week of July 17. Please note that televised versions may or may not be edited for language, nudity, violence and sexual situations.

Sunday, July 17, noon-2 p.m. EDT (Lifetime) "Bride Wars" (2009). Amiable if predictable romantic bauble about longtime devoted pals (Kate Hudson and Anne Hathaway, both in good comic form), who have dreamed since childhood of June weddings at New York's Plaza Hotel, but then, as adults, have a falling-out just before their much-anticipated nuptials there, after which each sets out to sabotage the other. With the significant moral reservation that both gals are shown to be cohabiting with their fiances, director Gary Winick's fitfully amusing "chick flick" otherwise has no significant sex or language issues, and there are, at least, some worthy if pat messages of lasting friendship and sensible priorities. Possibly acceptable for older teens. Premarital situations and some mildly suggestive dancing. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG — parental guidance suggested. Some material may not be suitable for children.

Tuesday, July 19, 8-10 p.m. EDT (TCM) "Where the Sidewalk Ends" (1950). Quirky crime story of a hardened cop (Dana Andrews) who accidentally kills a suspect, then falls for the dead man's girlfriend (Gene Tierney) while trying to pin the murder on a slippery mobster (Gary Merrill). Director Otto Preminger diverts attention from the improbable plot twists by focusing on the gritty atmosphere and matching characterizations. Stylized violence and troubled relationships. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-II — adults and adolescents. Not rated by the Motion Picture Association.

Thursday, July 21, 8-10 p.m. EDT (AMC) "National Lampoon's Vacation" (1983). Chevy Chase stars in this comic saga of a family's misadventures driving from Chicago to a California amusement park. As in any trip there are moments of fun and humor and long stretches of dull, tedious travel. Directed by Harold Ramis, there is some tasteless humor involving a corpse, some sexual innuendo and brief nudity. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was R — restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.

Friday, July 22, 9:15-11 p.m. EDT (TCM) "Paths of Glory" (1957). The terrible slaughter of World War I is re-created in this fact-based story of a French colonel (Kirk Douglas) who tries to save his men from being court-martialed for cowardice in a failed attack that should never have been ordered. Director Stanley Kubrick's anti-war classic contrasts the horrors of trench warfare at the front with the indifference and incompetence of the generals (Adolphe Menjou and George Macready) safely quartered in the rear. Graphic battlefield violence and a harrowing execution by firing squad. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-II — adults and adolescents. Not rated by the Motion Picture Association.

Saturday, July 23, 6:31-8 p.m. EDT (Cinemax) "The Uninvited" (2009). Restrained psychological thriller in which a mentally unstable teen girl (Emily Browning) and her sister (Arielle Kebbel) suspect their late mother's nurse (Elizabeth Banks) of murdering Mom to marry their father (David Strathairn). Directors Charles and Thomas Guard's mostly gore-free adaptation of a 2003 Korean film inspires a few chills the old-fashioned way, but its twisting plot is somewhat predictable. Brief nongraphic sexual activity, adultery, cohabitation, moderate violence, underage drinking, sexual and contraceptive references, occasional crass language, a few uses of profanity. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG-13 — parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

Saturday, July 23, 8-9:45 p.m. EDT (HBO) "The Bob's Burgers Movie" (2022). Frequently amusing animated comedy follows the adventures of the titular restaurant's owner (voice of H. Jon Benjamin), his wife (voice of John Roberts) and their three children (voices of Dan Mintz, Eugene Mirman and Kristen Schaal). With the payment on a bank loan looming, a sinkhole abruptly opens up in front of the family eatery, threatening its future. As Mom and Dad try to adapt to the situation, the youngsters set out to solve the murder of a skeleton found in the suddenly formed pit, hoping to clear their wealthy landlord (voice of Kevin Kline), who stands accused of the crime, and thus gain his financial help. Directors Loren Bouchard and Bernard Derriman's adaptation of the long-running Fox TV show, which Bouchard also co-wrote, mixes wry observations and quirky personalities with a few jaunty songs. But the dialogue is larded with restrained swearing while the elder daughter's romantic thoughts about a schoolmate (also voiced by Benjamin) sometimes focus on the seat of his pants, making this most appropriate for older teens and their seniors. Pervasive mildly profane language, occasional scatological and anatomical humor, several crass terms. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG-13 — parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.