NEW YORK (CNS) — The following are capsule reviews of theatrical movies on network and cable television the week of June 6. Please note that televised versions may or may not be edited for language, nudity, violence, and sexual situations.

Sunday, June 6, noon-2:15 p.m. EDT (TCM) "Mr. Deeds Goes to Town" (1936). When a small-town writer of greeting-card verses (Gary Cooper) inherits a fortune, he moves to New York City where he is made into a front-page laughingstock by a two-timing reporter (Jean Arthur) and his plans to help the poor embroil him in a sanity hearing. Director Frank Capra deftly juggles romance and humor in this entertaining Depression-era tale of an ordinary American whose homespun virtues triumph over big-city cynicism and greed. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-II — adults and adolescents. Not rated by the Motion Picture Association.

Wednesday, June 9, 6-8 p.m. EDT (TCM) "Andy Hardy Meets Debutante" (1940). In order to rescue the town orphanage trust fund, Judge Hardy (Lewis Stone) journeys to New York City, taking the family along on a trip that threatens to disgrace Andy (Mickey Rooney) back home until he's saved by a wealthy friend (Judy Garland). Directed by George B. Seitz, this installment in the Hardy series provides some period amusement as well as an incidental lesson in democracy. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-I — general patronage. Not rated by the Motion Picture Association. (The last in a series of nine Andy Hardy films, beginning with "A Family Affair" (1936) 6-7:15 a.m. EDT)

Saturday, June 12, 11 a.m.-2:30 p.m. EDT (AMC) "2012" (2009). In the disaster movie to end all fiasco flicks, a doomsday cataclysm results in billions losing their lives as the earth's crust breaks apart, dismantling civilization and rearranging the continents. Director Roland Emmerich gives his special-effects wizards license to test the limits of the technically plausible and morally palatable, while asking moviegoers to take heart as the scenario affords a White House geologist (Chiwetel Ejiofor) and a divorced science-fiction writer (John Cusack) the chance to exhibit altruism, even as their exploits are interspersed with disturbing apocalyptic imagery, including the destruction of St. Peter's Basilica and the Sistine Chapel. Considerable crude and crass language, much profanity, an obscene gesture, a few instances of sexual innuendo. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG-13 — parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

Saturday, June 12, 8-10:10 p.m. EDT (Cinemax) "12 Strong" (2018). True military adventures don't come any more rousing than this. Chris Hemsworth plays a Green Beret captain leading a small Special Forces unit on horseback in rugged terrain in the early weeks of fighting in Afghanistan after 9/11. Director Nicolai Fuglsig, working from a script by Ted Tally and Peter Craig, avoids what could have become flag-waving jingoistic moments, preferring to show the Americans quietly going about their tasks. Intense, lengthy and realistic combat violence and gore, a scene of an execution of a teacher in front of three young girls. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was R — restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.