NEW YORK (CNS) — The following are capsule reviews of theatrical movies on network and cable television the week of March 28. Please note that televised versions may or may not be edited for language, nudity, violence and sexual situations.

Sunday, March 28, 8-10:15 p.m. EDT (TCM) "I Want to Live!" (1958). Compelling fact-based drama about a small-time crook and occasional prostitute (Susan Hayward) who in 1955 is convicted of a vicious murder on questionable evidence and, after many lengthy appeals, is executed in a California gas chamber. Directed by Robert Wise, the movie does not minimize the woman's criminal past. But, by suggesting she was railroaded on the murder charge, its harrowing portrayal of her execution becomes a powerful indictment of capital punishment. Earned Hayward's Oscar for her tough yet sympathetic performance as a victim of injustice. Adult themes and detailed depiction of an execution. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. Not rated by the Motion Picture Association.

Thursday, April 1, 8-10 p.m. EDT (TCM) "All the King's Men" (1949). Strong adaptation of Robert Penn Warren's novel about a poor country lawyer (Broderick Crawford) whose rise to political power during the Depression transforms him from a populist reformer into a ruthless demagogue with national ambitions. Directed by Robert Rossen, the picture is strikingly realistic in showing the corruption of democratic processes by a politician closely resembling Louisiana's Huey Long, though is less convincing in its portrayal of his personal failings and moral transgressions. Mature themes and treatment. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. Not rated by the Motion Picture Association.

Friday, April 2, 6-9 p.m. EDT (Showtime) "The Godfather" (1972). Blockbuster screen version of the Mario Puzo novel about a Mafia family's rise, decline and resurgence in the murderous world of New York racketeering. Marlon Brando plays the aging but indomitable don with James Caan and Al Pacino as leading family members. Francis Ford Coppola's direction is a study in control and pacing with all the right touches in establishing the proper 1940s ambience. The murders are plentiful and gruesome, with little spared in detailing the intricacies of mob life. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was R — restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.

Saturday, April 3, 5-8 p.m. EDT (AMC) "Moneyball" (2011). Based on the book by Michael Lewis, this enjoyable, thinking person's sports movie centers on the real-life general manager (Brad Pitt) of baseball's Oakland Athletics who, together with a young statistician (Jonah Hill), gambles on a new approach to the game and fields a team with a comparatively miniscule payroll. Director Bennett Miller, working from a script by Steven Zaillian and Aaron Sorkin, has crafted a mature, humorous and modest film that will appeal to aficionados and nonfans alike. Respectful of America's pastime yet eager to spur positive change, it relays a timeless, double-headed piece of wisdom: Money can't buy baseball pennants or happiness. Two uses of rough language, some crude and crass talk, an instance of sexual banter, a few sexist remarks and a scene in which a player's religiosity is treated in a sarcastic manner. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG-13 — parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

Saturday, April 3, 7-11:44 p.m. EDT (ABC) "The Ten Commandments" (1956). Less an inspirational story based on biblical sources than a dramatic vehicle with a sense of history, director Cecil B. DeMille's epic production offers some spectacular re-creations, excellent technical effects and good acting from a fine cast, including Charlton Heston (as Moses), Yul Brynner, Anne Baxter, Edward G. Robinson and many other stars of the era. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-I — general patronage. The Motion Picture Association of America rating was G — general audiences. All ages admitted.