NEW YORK (CNS) -- The following are capsule reviews of theatrical movies on network and cable television the week of May 17. Please note that televised versions may or may not be edited for language, nudity, violence, and sexual situations. Check locl

NEW YORK (CNS) -- The following are capsule reviews of theatrical movies on network and cable television the week of May 17. Please note that televised versions may or may not be edited for language, nudity, violence, and sexual situations. Check local listings for times.

Sunday, May 17, 9:40-11:20 a.m. EDT (Showtime) "Failure to Launch" (2006). Uneven but oddly likable comedy about a professional "intervention" consultant (Sarah Jessica Parker) hired by the parents (Kathy Bates and Terry Bradshaw) of a 35-year-old, still-living-at-home jock (Matthew McConaughey) in the hopes of making him independent enough to move out, with predictable romantic complications. Director Tom Dey maintains a spirited pace, there are some pleasing performances, the sylvan and aquatic settings are easy on the eyes, and the ending is morally sound, outweighing too many conversational expletives and a permissive view of premarital sex. Profanity, rough and crude language and expressions, implied sexual situations and banter and a comic instance of rear male nudity. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III -- adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG-13 -- parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

Tuesday, May 19, 6:15-8 p.m. EDT (TCM) "Black Narcissus" (1946). Engrossing British adaptation of Rumer Godden's novel about the difficulties confronting an Anglican community of nuns (headed by Deborah Kerr) in a remote area of northern India where a native student (Jean Simmons) and an English administrator (David Farrar) upset their spiritual peace. Directed by Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger; the community's religious mission in an exotic alien environment is handled with sensitivity, with most of the dramatic conflict stemming from the human foibles of the characters. Sexual situations and innuendo. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-II -- adults and adolescents. Not rated by the Motion Picture Association.

Thursday, May 21, 6:05-8 p.m. EDT (Showtime) "Under the Tuscan Sun" (2003). Standard but enjoyable yarn about a recently divorced San Francisco author (Diane Lane) suffering from depression and writer's block who impulsively buys a Tuscan villa in Italy with the hopes of recharging her life. Based loosely on Frances Mayes' travel memoir, writer-director Audrey Wells' film is light on believable plot but packed with lovely Italian vistas with Lane's appealing performance elevating an otherwise predictable fairy tale. An implied sexual encounter, references to a lesbian relationship, brief crass words and an instance of rough language and profanity. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III -- adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG-13 -- parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

Friday, May 22, 10 p.m.-midnight EDT (TCM) "The Daydreamer" (1966). A little boy runs away from home and has a series of adventures, most of them taking place in his imagination. Jules Bass directs a part-animation, part live-action children's entertainment combining the biblical concept of Paradise with the fancy of Hans Christian Anderson and the result adds up to a diverting fantasy. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-I -- general patronage. Not rated by the Motion Picture Association.

Saturday, May 23, 2:30-5:30 p.m. EDT (AMC) "Ghost" (1990). The ghost of a murdered young banker (Patrick Swayze) uses a phony spiritualist (Whoopi Goldberg) to warn his lover (Demi Moore) that she too is in deadly peril until he can discover why he was killed and stop those responsible. Director Jerry Zucker's offbeat but uneven blend of fantasy, horror and comedy is an engagingly sentimental thriller plump with quirky characters and edgy performances. Some grisly violence, acceptance of premarital sex and occasional profanity. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III -- adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG-13 -- parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

Saturday, May 23, 9:35-11:15 p.m. EDT (Cinemax) "Dickie Roberts: Former Child Star" (2003). Surprisingly entertaining comedy about a washed-up former child celeb (David Spade) who, in order to prepare for a role which could reignite his career, hires a suburban family to experience what it is like to grow up normal. Directed by Sam Weisman, the film's otherwise positive, family-values message about the prizing of love over fame is muddied by several unnecessarily lewd scenes. Recurring crude, sexually related humor, a sensual encounter, as well as some crass language and drug references. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III -- adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG-13 -- parents are strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.