NEW YORK (CNS) — The following are capsule reviews of theatrical movies on network and cable television the week of May 2. Please note that televised versions may or may not be edited for language, nudity, violence, and sexual situations.

Sunday, May 2, 1-3:45 p.m. EDT (TCM) "Oliver!" (1968). Rousing British musical drawn from Charles Dickens' "Oliver Twist" but bearing little resemblance to the original in adaptor Lionel Bart's borrowing only the chief characters and turning them loose in what amounts to a colorful, swirling-stomping-singing Cockney street show. As Fagin, rubber-faced Ron Moody carries most of the burden, with Mark Lester perfectly winning as Oliver, Jack Wild stealing scene after scene (along with handy wallets) and Harry Secombe as a bumbling Mr. Bumble. Under Carol Reed's direction, it all adds up to delightful fare for the entire family. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-I — general patronage. The Motion Picture Association rating was G — general audiences. All ages admitted.

Monday, May 3, 9:30-11:15 p.m. EDT (TCM) "Crossfire" (1947). Tightly wound thriller in which a police detective (Robert Young) investigating a murder case links the fact that the victim (Sam Levene) was a Jew to a rabid bigot among a group of soldiers (Robert Ryan, Robert Mitchum and others). Director Edward Dmytryk handles the theme of anti-Semitism directly yet with some sensitivity as the convincing story of a hate crime is unraveled by a persistent cop. Stylized violence, considerable psychological tension and some racist epithets. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-II — adults and adolescents. Not rated by the Motion Pictures Association.

Friday, May 7, 8-11:03 p.m. EDT (Lifetime) "Madea's Witness Protection" (2012). Writer-director Tyler Perry reprises the role of Madea, the familiar, frequently mixed-up, but mostly moral force of nature in a muumuu. In one of her weaker outings, her district attorney nephew (also Perry) convinces Madea to shelter a white family (headed by Eugene Levy) after a massive corporate Ponzi scheme goes awry, leaving Levy's falsely suspected character not only facing fraud charges but threatened by mobsters as well. Perry plays on the well-worn theme of the cultural shock that ensues when stuffy Caucasians mingle with earthy Black folks. Still, his trademark themes of respect for parents, adherence to one's religious beliefs and self-confidence are not to be quarreled with, any more than is his feisty heroine herself. Occasional slapstick violence as well as fleeting crass language and drug references. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG-13 — parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

Saturday, May 8, 8-9:43 p.m. EDT (Cinemax) "Unleashed" (2005). Surprisingly engaging action drama centering on a lethal man-child (Jet Li), who is raised by a ruthless gangster (Bob Hoskins) and conditioned to kill on cue like an attack dog, and who experiences kindness and compassion for the first time when he is taken in by a blind piano tuner (Morgan Freeman), who helps him reclaim his humanity and solve the mystery surrounding his foggy past. Stylishly directed by Louis Leterrier and heavy on bone-breaking brutality, themes addressed include the depersonalizing effects of cruelty, the healing power of love, the malleability of young minds for good or evil, and the nature of free will, elevating it above most mindless action films. Recurring intense violence, including several vicious beatings, a brief sexual encounter, fleeting nudity and much rough and crude language and humor, as well as profanity. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was L — limited adult audience, films whose problematic content many adults would find troubling. The Motion Picture Association rating was R — restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.

Saturday, May 8, 8-10 p.m. EDT (HBO) "Greenland" (2020). With the fragments of a huge comet on a collision course with Earth and threatening to wipe out most of humanity, an Atlanta-based structural engineer (Gerard Butler), his estranged wife (Morena Baccarin) and their young son (Roger Dale Floyd) are among those selected by the federal government for evacuation to a network of underground bunkers on the island of the title. But their exodus is hampered by the swift breakdown of the social order and by other factors, leaving them to fend for themselves. The highs and lows of human nature are revealed by the crisis and screenwriter Chris Sparling keeps the proceedings grounded both in the ordeals through which the trio passes and in the spouses' effort to reconcile. Implicitly pro-life, director Ric Roman Waugh's engaging action drama also showcases positive values via the courageous concern Butler's character displays toward those in peril. But the mayhem the celestial fireballs unleash is too unsettling for kids while the vocabulary of the endangered will lead most parents to conclude that this quest for survival is not a journey for teens either. Mostly stylized but disturbing violence with occasional gore, a few gruesome sights, an adultery theme, brief scatological humor, several instances each of profanity and of milder swearing, about a dozen crude terms. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG-13 — parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.