NEW YORK (CNS) — The following are capsule reviews of theatrical movies on network and cable television the week of May 30. Please note that televised versions may or may not be edited for language, nudity, violence and sexual situations.

Sunday, May 30, 5:30-8 p.m. EDT (Lifetime) "Madea's Big Happy Family" (2011). Tyler Perry — who wrote and directed this screen adaptation of his eponymous play — puts on the muumuu again as the always short-tempered Madea. Here, Madea's appealingly gentle niece (Loretta Devine) learns she has terminal cancer and tries to gather her three adult children (Natalie Desselle Reid, Shannon Kane and Shad "Bow Wow" Moss) at her house to tell them the bad news. But the grown siblings are all locked in dysfunctional relationships, while one - a recently released ex-con — is also dabbling once more in the drug dealing that landed him in jail. Worthy themes of mutual respect between spouses, deference to adults on the part of youngsters and familial unity are sometimes lost amid questionable comic characterizations and a flurry of slaps upside the head. Marijuana use, some adult humor, fleeting crass language, slapstick violence. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG-13 — parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

Monday, May 31, 8-10 p.m. EDT (ABC) "The Princess and the Frog" (2009). Enchanting animated musical, set in 1920s New Orleans, in which a voodoo sorcerer (voice of Keith David) casts a spell that complicates the lives of a visiting prince (voice of Bruno Campos), the headstrong heiress he hopes to marry (voice of Jennifer Cody) and her industrious working-class best friend (voice of Anika Noni Rose). As directed and co-written by John Musker and Ron Clements, the lavish hand-drawn romance, which also features delightful voice work by Michael-Leon Wooley as a jazz-loving alligator and Jim Cummings as a Cajun firefly, emphasizes the value of love over material wealth and provides quality entertainment for all ages, though images of fire-breathing masks and evil sprites may scare some tots. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-I — general patronage. The Motion Picture Association rating was G — general audiences. All ages admitted.

Monday, May 31, 8-10:15 p.m. EDT (TCM) "Battleground" (1949). Centering on the dogged resistance of an American infantry unit cut off in the Battle of the Bulge — Hitler's last desperate offensive in the West — the movie makes the most of its cross-section of GIs (Van Johnson, John Hodiak, Ricardo Montalban, James Whitmore, George Murphy, et. al.) as representative of the nation's ethnic, regional and social diversity. Veteran director William Wellman keeps the action taut and credible, uses the battlefield's snow-filled terrain to add further misery to the unit's plight and tries to keep his grab-bag collection of civilian-soldiers from turning into superheroes. Wartime violence and mild sexual references. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-I — general patronage. Not rated by the Motion Picture Association.

Thursday, June 3, 5-8 p.m. EDT (AMC) "Shooter" (2007). Satisfying conspiracy thriller that plays like a Tom Clancy "Rambo," with Mark Wahlberg as an ex-Army sniper framed by government bigwig Danny Glover for an attempted presidential assassination that killed a foreign bishop instead. Director Antoine Fuqua keeps the grimly photographed action brisk and believable, and the plot twists mostly convincing. Much military violence with bloodshed, including a scene of anonymous soldiers immolated by napalm, the aftermath of torture, partial female nudity. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was R — restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.

Friday, June 4, 6-8 p.m. EDT (TCM) "Night Must Fall" (1937). Chilling suspense picture from the Emlyn Williams play in which a drifter (Robert Montgomery) charms a wealthy old lady (May Whitty) into giving him a job, until her secretary (Rosalind Russell) comes to suspect he is the one being sought by the police for a series of murders in the area. Directed by Richard Thorpe, the suspense mounts quite effectively in a taut story made convincing by Montgomery's compelling performance as a psychopathic killer. More menace than violence. The Catholic News Service classification is A-II — adults and adolescents. Not rated by the Motion Picture Association.

Saturday, June 5, 1:35-3:30 p.m. EDT (Showtime) "Beauty Shop" (2005). Amiable comedy about a widowed mother (Queen Latifah) working as a hairdresser who, after a falling-out with the shop's flamboyant owner (scene-stealing Kevin Bacon), opens her own establishment in the ghetto and, thanks to her styling prowess and warmhearted people skills, overcomes myriad obstacles to succeed. Bille Woodruff's engaging film is a perfect showcase for the likable Latifah, the eclectic ensemble cast (including Alfre Woodard, Alicia Silverstone, Djimon Hounsou and Andie MacDowell) makes for interesting watching, and despite some salty street language and salon sex chatter the movie imparts solid messages about loyalty, friendship and parenting. Some profanity, crude language and crass expressions, sexual innuendo, suggestive dancing. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG-13 — parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

Saturday, June 5, 8-9:52 p.m. EDT (Cinemax) "The Italian Job" (2003). High-octane caper flick about a gang of professional thieves (including Mark Wahlberg and Edward Norton) who must track down and outfox one of their own who double-crosses them after they steal millions in Italian gold and makes off to Los Angeles with the loot. A formulaic revamping of the Michael Caine-Noel Coward 1969 heist classic, director F. Gary Gray's film scores points with deftly orchestrated action sequences, but flounders with a predictable premise and threadbare characters. A benign portrayal of theft, an implied sexual encounter, an instance of rough language, some profanities and brief scenes of violence. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG-13 — parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.