NEW YORK (CNS) — The following are capsule reviews of theatrical movies on network and cable television the week of Nov. 15. Please note that televised versions may or may not be edited for language, nudity, violence, and sexual situations.

Sunday, Nov. 15, 2-5 p.m. EST (A&E) "The Magnificent Seven" (2016). After a ruthless gold-mining mogul (Peter Sarsgaard) uses his private army of thugs to slaughter several inhabitants of a frontier town in cold blood, and threatens the survivors with a similar fate unless they sell their land to him for a pittance, the widow (Haley Bennett) of one of his victims hires a roving lawman (Denzel Washington) to organize resistance. The result is a motley band of skilled gunmen (most prominently Chris Pratt and Ethan Hawke) and an extended shoot-'em-up showdown. At once violent and somewhat thoughtful, director Antoine Fuqua's jaunty western, the remake of a 1960 film that was itself an adaptation of Akira Kurosawa's "Seven Samurai" from 1954, pauses occasionally to reflect on the dividing line between justice and vengeance. It also features Christian references and imagery as well as examples of devotion ranging from the sincere to the eccentric. Though it's a chivalrous parable that presents Catholic theology's just-war theory in microcosm and showcases self-sacrificing heroism, its pervasive mayhem will nonetheless seem unjustified to some. Constant stylized violence with gunplay and explosions but very little blood, several uses of profanity, a couple of mild oaths, numerous crude and crass expressions. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG-13 — parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

Monday, Nov. 16, 8-11:15 p.m. EST (TCM) "The Diary of Anne Frank" (1959). Somber dramatization of the long ordeal facing an adolescent girl (Millie Perkins), her parents (Joseph Schildkraut and Gusti Huber) and another Jewish family (including Shelley Winters, Lou Jacobi and Ed Wynn) hiding from the Nazis in a secret room above a warehouse in World War II Amsterdam. Directed by George Stevens, the fact-based account painstakingly conveys the group's determination to survive their desperate plight. But the effort is flawed by a strangely limp performance in the title role. Much tension and menacing atmosphere. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-I — general patronage. Not rated by the Motion Picture Association.

Wednesday, Nov. 18, 7:15-9 p.m. EST (Showtime) "The First Wives Club" (1996). Deserted by wealthy husbands who have callously lined up younger replacements, three irate wives (Bette Midler, Goldie Hawn and Diane Keaton) scheme to humiliate and financially drain their estranged spouses. Directed by Hugh Wilson, the revenge-themed comedy is weighed down by unconvincing plot contrivances, despite spirited performances and caustically funny dialogue. Some sexual innuendo, an off-screen suicide, fleeting comic violence and an instance of profanity. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG — parental guidance suggested. Some material may not be suitable for children.

Friday, Nov. 20, 8-10:30 p.m. EST (AMC) "Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory" (1971). Screen version of Roald Dahl's children's story about a candy manufacturer (Gene Wilder) who conducts an electrifying tour of his factory for five lucky children who learn that greed and selfishness can be their own reward. Even the punishments, occasionally a bit gruesome for younger children, are in good fun. Director Mel Stuart manages to avoid the cloying sentimentality of similar children's movies, though it's never quite as magical as one would have hoped. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-I — general patronage. The Motion Picture Association rating was G — general audiences. All Ages Admitted.

Saturday, Nov. 21, 2-4:15 p.m. EST (TCM) "Gunga Din" (1939). Classic adventure yarn loosely based on the Rudyard Kipling poem about a water carrier (Sam Jaffe) in Victoria's India who here dies a hero with a bugle warning British forces of an ambush. Director George Stevens focuses the action on three seasoned sergeants (Victor McLaglen, Cary Grant and Douglas Fairbanks Jr.) whose bickering comradeship provides some hardy fun while fighting Thugs, a long-suppressed murder cult led by a formidable foe (Eduardo Ciannelli). Old-fashioned "manly" celebration of such virtues as loyalty, courage and steadfastness, though with plenty of stylized violence. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-I — general patronage. Not rated by the Motion Picture Association.

Saturday, Nov. 21, 9-11 p.m. EST (Showtime) "First Reformed" (2018). This drama about a Protestant minister (Ethan Hawke) in upstate New York has quite a bit to say about religious belief, environmentalism, grieving, alienation, rage, the power of love and the corruption of religion by money and power. Writer-director Paul Schrader does not condescend to belief but is interested in launching discussions about what faith means and what actions best express it. Some gore, mature themes, fleeting scatological references. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was R — restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.