NEW YORK (CNS) — The following are capsule reviews of theatrical movies on network and cable television the week of Nov. 22. Please note that televised versions may or may not be edited for language, nudity, violence and sexual situations.

Monday, Nov. 23, 8-10:30 p.m. EST (TCM) "Red River" (1948). Western classic in which a hard-bitten Texas rancher (John Wayne) stakes his future on getting his herd to Abilene, but on the way he pushes his riders so hard they turn against him in a revolt led by his foster son (Montgomery Clift). Director Howard Hawks elevates the story of a rugged cattle drive to epic proportion with sweeping action scenes, colorful characters, numerous mishaps along the trail and, at its center, the conflict between the rancher and the grown man he's raised from a boy. Harsh period violence and a sexual situation. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. Not rated by the Motion Picture Association.

Wednesday, Nov. 25, 8-10 p.m. EST (AMC) "The Polar Express" (2004). Visually captivating animated fantasy — in which Tom Hanks plays five separate roles — about a doubting young boy who is whisked away on Christmas Eve aboard a magic train bound for Santa's village in the North Pole. Based on the children's novel by Chris Van Allsburg, director Rob Zemeckis' hauntingly beautiful fairy tale celebrates childlike wonder and — though secular in tone — imparts a profoundly faith-friendly message about the importance of believing in things that can't be seen. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-I — general patronage. The Motion Picture Association rating was G — general audiences. All ages admitted.

Thursday, Nov. 26, 9-11 p.m. EST (Showtime) "1917" (2019). Gripping historical drama, set in the midst of World War I, in which two British soldiers (George MacKay and Dean-Charles Chapman) are dispatched across enemy territory to call off an attack by an officer (Benedict Cumberbatch) whose men are about to fall into a German trap, a mission made more urgent by the fact that the brother (Richard Madden) of Chapman's character is among those facing slaughter if they fail. By turns harrowing and lyrically beautiful, and deeply humane throughout, director and co-writer Sam Mendes' film displays both the horrors of trench combat and the endurance of fundamental decency and spiritual striving. Unsparing in its portrayal of misery and desperation, it's also luminous in its affirmation of civilized values and the triumph of faith, broadly considered, over cynicism. Much combat violence with gore, numerous gruesome sights, slightly irreverent humor, a fleeting sexual reference, about a half-dozen uses of profanity, several rough terms, occasional crude and crass language. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was R — restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.

Friday, Nov. 27, 6-8 p.m. EST (TCM) "Shadow of a Doubt" (1943). A young girl (Teresa Wright) begins to suspect that her favorite uncle (Joseph Cotton) is wanted for a series of murders. Director Alfred Hitchcock unfolds his usual dark doings in the commonplace setting of small-town America's solid citizenry with uncommonly suspenseful results. A classic psychological thriller rich in visual understatement rather than shocking graphics. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-II — adults and adolescents. Not rated by the Motion Picture Association.

Saturday, Nov. 28, 8-9:40 p.m. EST (HBO) "The Call of the Wild" (2020). Jack London's beloved 1903 novel returns to the big screen for the seventh time in this computer-generated special effects extravaganza, directed by Chris Sanders. A pet St. Bernard-Scotch Collie mix dog is kidnapped from his California owner (Bradley Whitford) and shipped to the Yukon, where gold fever is raging, and large dogs are in demand to pull sleds. He joins a team run by two benevolent mail carriers (Omar Sy and Cara Gee), before being sold to a wicked gold prospector (Dan Stevens). Eventually he's rescued by a kindly explorer (Harrison Ford) and joins him on an expedition deep into the wilderness, all the while hearing the "call" to return to his primal roots. Although purists will be disappointed by the defanging of London's searing tale, this is a highly entertaining comedy-drama with solid messages about love, friendship and respect, suitable for all but the youngest viewers. Mild violence, characters in peril. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-II — adults and adolescents. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG — parental guidance suggested. Some material may not be suitable for children.

Saturday, Nov. 28, 9:30-11:15 p.m. EST (Cinemax) "The Others" (2001). Eerie psychological thriller set in 1945 about a mother (Nicole Kidman) and her two photosensitive children who live in darkness in a remote island mansion, but soon discover they are not alone. Writer-director Alejandro Amenabar's chilling tale of isolation is well-written, deftly building tension until its startling conclusion while prompting questions about faith and the mysteries of life after death. Mature questioning of afterlife and some menace with several frightening moments. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG-13 — parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.