NEW YORK (CNS) — The following are capsule reviews of theatrical movies on network and cable television the week of Nov. 8. Please note that televised versions may or may not be edited for language, nudity, violence, and sexual situations.

Monday, Nov. 9, 10 p.m.-12:05 a.m. EST (Showtime) "First Cow" (2020). Director Kelly Reichardt co-wrote the screenplay for this historical drama set in the Pacific Northwest of the 1820s with Jonathan Raymond, working from Raymond's 2012 novel "The Half-Life." The specific setting is Oregon's Umpqua River region, woodsy and wild, where the principal work consists of beaver-trapping that utilizes exploited Native American labor. There two outsiders (John Magaro, Orion Lee) seek their fortunes marketing "oily cakes," doughy concoctions that make all who consume them dream of their childhood homes. The catch is, the only way to make this opportunity for themselves is by stealing milk from a rich man's (Toby Jones) cow. Discussions of morality thus form the heart of the film's dialogue. A sharp examination of capitalism and entrepreneurship combines with a sympathetic look at the plight of the marginalized to produce a piece of minimalist poetic glory. Probably acceptable for older adolescents. Mature themes, fleeting crude language. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG-13 — parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

Wednesday, Nov. 11, 6-8 p.m. EST (Showtime) "The Last of the Mohicans" (1992). When the French and Indian War erupts on New York's Colonial frontier, heroic woodsman Hawkeye (Daniel Day-Lewis) cannot save a British force from being massacred in the wilderness but at least he's able to rescue its commander's daughter (Madeleine Stowe) from a wicked Huron warrior (Wes Studi). In adapting the James Fenimore Cooper classic to the screen, director Michael Mann updates its romanticized version of pioneer life amid noble woodland savages by dwelling in realistic detail on the inhuman cruelties of hand-to-hand combat. Many graphic depictions of deadly violence and bloodshed. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was R — restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.

Wednesday, Nov. 11, 9-11:30 p.m. EST (TCM) "Sergeant York" (1941). In the dark months preceding America's entry into World War II, Gary Cooper had one of his best roles as Alvin C. York, a backwoodsman from the Tennessee hills who wrestled with his religious conviction that killing was immoral to become a battlefield hero in World War I. Director Howard Hawks succeeds best in evoking the honest, homespun virtues of rural America but is less convincing in portraying the moral conflict between pacifism and patriotism. Though its resolution may seem dated today, the issue remains basically unchanged in our nuclear age. Wartime violence. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-I — general patronage. Not rated by the Motion Picture Association.

Friday, Nov. 13, 7-9:30 p.m. EST (AMC) "My Cousin Vinny" (1992). Tough-talking comedy has New York college students Ralph Macchio and Mitchell Whitfield improbably charged with murder in the deep South, then defended by rookie Brooklyn lawyer Joe Pesci with a little help from girlfriend Marisa Tomei. Relying on blue-collar and Southern stereotypes, director Jonathan Lynn fashions a fitfully funny, fish-out-of-water courtroom comedy. Much rough language, a few double entendres and an implied premarital relationship. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was R — restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.

Saturday, Nov. 14, 6-9:45 p.m. EST (HBO) "Dolittle" (2020). Chaotic comic adventure, loosely based on Hugh Lofting's "Doctor Dolittle" books for children, about a physician-turned-veterinarian (Robert Downey Jr.) who has acquired the ability to communicate with the critters he treats. Having become a recluse after the death of his wife, he's drawn out of seclusion when an attendant from Buckingham Palace (Carmel Laniado) brings news that Queen Victoria (Jessie Buckley) is gravely ill. Since the monarch's death would mean the loss of the animal sanctuary she granted him for her lifetime, he hurries off to London, then sets out on a quest to find the mystical tree whose fruit is the only antidote to the poison the sovereign has surreptitiously been given. He's accompanied by the good-hearted lad (Harry Collett) who's out to become his apprentice and by his chief adviser, a wise parrot (voice of Emma Thompson) who doubles as the story's narrator. Director and co-writer Stephen Gaghan's adaptation is an amiable mess — well-intentioned, but silly and disorganized. Some potentially frightening interludes and a bit of grown-up joking aside, though, worrisome elements are minimal. Stylized action and physical violence, characters in peril, a couple of mild oaths, brief scatological and anatomical humor. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-II — adults and adolescents. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG — parental guidance suggested. Some material may not be suitable for children.