NEW YORK (CNS) — The following are capsule reviews of theatrical movies on network and cable tele-vision the week of Oct. 10. Please note that televised versions may or may not be edited for language, nudity, violence, and sexual situations.

Sunday, Oct. 10, 1:35-3:30 p.m. EDT (Showtime) "Crash" (2005). Powerful, beautifully crafted film with a strong moral center about a disparate, racially mixed group of Los Angeles residents, including a district attorney and his wife (Brendan Fraser and Sandra Bullock), a hardened cop and a rookie (Matt Dillon and Ryan Phillippe), an immigrant store owner, a locksmith, a pair of carjackers, a television director, and a weary detective with professional and domestic problems (Don Cheadle), whose lives will intersect in unlikely and redemptive ways. Writer-director Paul Haggis takes a story and milieu that at first seems sordid and ugly, and with the help of a terrific ensemble cast, has fashioned a transcendently moving essay on the benevolence that may lie beneath racial intolerance, and the interconnected-ness of human beings, showing how good and bad can coexist in all of us, and how the former generally prevails. Much rough and crude language, some violence, many racial epithets, sexual situations, including one encounter with partial nudity, another with suggestive groping and innuendo, and a bloody traffic-accident injury. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was L — limited adult audience, films whose problematic content many adults would find troubling. The Motion Picture Association rating was R — restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.

Monday, Oct. 11, 6-8 p.m. EDT (TCM) "Arsenic and Old Lace" (1944). Droll adaptation of Joseph Kesselring's madcap stage hit about an irascible theater critic (Cary Grant) whose dotty maiden aunts (Josephine Hull and Jean Adair) serve lonely old men elderberry wine laced with poison. Director Frank Capra's black comedy features a great cast, including Boris Karloff and Peter Lorre as criminal interlopers, but the wacky proceedings are not for all tastes. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-II — adults and adolescents. Not rated by the Motion Picture Association.

Friday, Oct. 15, 6:15-8 p.m. EDT (TCM) "Carnival of Souls" (1962). Low-budget but effective horror tale directed by Herk Harvey follows the eerie experiences of a church organist (Candace Hilligoss) after she emerges from a car crash in a Kansas river until her reunion weeks later with others who died in the same accident. Sinister, unsettling atmosphere and sexual situations. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. Not rated by the Motion Picture Association.

Saturday, Oct. 16, 6-8 p.m. EDT (Lifetime) "Heaven Is for Real" (2014). After coming close to death during an operation, a 4-year-old boy (Connor Corum) startles his Wesleyan minister father (Greg Kin-near) and choir-director mother (Kelly Reilly) by announcing that he visited heaven and met Jesus — as well as two deceased family members. But his matter-of-fact statements about paradise stir controversy in his family's small-town Nebraska community and, ironically, provoke a crisis of faith for his dad. Director and co-writer Randall Wallace's adaptation of Todd Burpo's best-selling account of his son Colton's experiences is substantial and moving, thanks in large part to the mature way in which it grapples with fundamental issues of religious belief and doubt. A few scenes involving illness and a painful accident might not be suitable for the littlest moviegoers; an unspoken innuendo between husband and wife will sail well over their heads. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-I — general patronage. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG — parental guidance suggested. Some material may not be suitable for children.

Saturday, Oct. 16, 8-9:45 p.m. EDT (HBO) "Those Who Wish Me Dead" (2021). Haunted by a forest fire tragedy for which she blames herself, an emotionally isolated, self-destructive smokejumper (Angelina Jolie) is forced to pull herself together when a young boy (Finn Little) being tracked by the assassins (Aidan Gillen and Nicholas Hoult) who killed his father (Jake Weber), an accountant who uncovered explosive information he managed to share with his son before his death, comes under her protection. Though the local sheriff's deputy (Jon Bernthal) and his wife (Medina Senghore), a trained survivalist, are also out to rescue the lad, his pursuers prove to be both ruthless and relentless. Director and co-writer (with Michael Koryta and Charles Leavitt) Taylor Sheridan's loose adaptation of Koryta's 2014 novel benefits from an offbeat plot and the appeal of its central duo. But some slightly unsavory mentoring by Jolie's character briefly sours the proceedings while the ribald banter she exchanges with her colleagues, the extremes to which the murderers are willing to resort as well as the graphic depiction of the mayhem they wreak makes this thriller strictly grown-up fare. Much violence with brief but vivid gore, sexual humor and references, about a half-dozen profanities, a couple of milder oaths, pervasive rough and considerable crude language. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical ver-sion was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was R — restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.

Saturday, Oct. 16, 9:54-11:45 p.m. EDT (Cinemax) "The Way Back" (2020). Director Gavin O'Con-nor's sports drama tells a story of hope and redemption after devastating loss. When the basketball coach at the Catholic high school he attended suffers a heart attack, a former hoops star-turned-alcoholic-construction-worker (Ben Affleck) reluctantly agrees to take over the program. As he exerts a positive influence on the players (most prominently Brandon Wilson and Melvin Gregg), he finds a new sense of purpose and begins to heal. The film, penned by Brad Ingelsby, does nothing to break free of the traditional formula of sports movies. Yet Affleck carries the proceedings with able acting and the younger members of the cast, especially Wilson, give believable performances as well. An upbeat tale, though one permeated with off-color dialogue. Mature themes, including alcoholism, a few instances of profanity, frequent crude and crass language, a vulgar sexual reference. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was R — restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.