NEW YORK (CNS) — The following are capsule reviews of theatrical movies on network and cable television the week of Sept. 13. Please note that televised versions may or may not be edited for language, nudity, violence, and sexual situations.

Wednesday, Sept. 16, 10 p.m.-midnight EDT (TCM) "Peggy Sue Got Married'' (1986). A middle-aged mom (Kathleen Turner), about to be divorced from her unfaithful husband (Nicolas Cage), relives her past when she faints at a class reunion and discovers that the person she was and has become are one and the same. Director Francis Ford Coppola carefully controls the sentimental romanticism inherent in this story showing the continuum of values through the course of an individual's life. Brief scene of lovemaking and some rough language. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-II — adults and adolescents. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG-13 — parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

Friday, Sept. 18, 8-10:30 p.m. EDT (AMC) "Men in Black 3" (2012). Moderately fun, but ultimately forgettable third round for the well-established secret alien crime-fighting duo of Agents J (Will Smith) and K (Tommy Lee Jones). In this outing, J wakes up in an alternate timeline to find that an extraterrestrial villain (Jemaine Clement) has killed K off and begun the enslavement of humanity. So J must set the clock back — all the way to 1969 — and dissuade a younger version of K, played by Josh Brolin, from pursuing the course that would eventually lead him to his doom. Director Barry Sonnenfeld delivers a slightly tired retread of the comedy franchise, the premise for which derives from Lowell Cunningham's comic book "The Men in Black." And screenwriter Etan Cohen's dialogue makes wholly unnecessary forages into vulgar language and profanity, putting this beyond the pale for younger audiences. Frequent action violence, at least two instances of profanity, occasional crude and crass language. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG-13 — parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

Saturday, Sept. 19, 1:45-3:30 p.m. EDT (TCM) "3:10 to Yuma" (1957). Intelligent, well-crafted Western in which a small Arizona rancher (Van Heflin) in need of ready cash takes the job of delivering a captured badman (Glenn Ford) to the federal marshal on the next train. But, as they await its arrival, the outlaw's band of ruthless gunmen show up to free him. Director Delmer Daves concentrates on the shifting relationship between the decent family man and his cynical prisoner in a psychological war of wit and nerve until the suspenseful situation erupts in the final showdown. Stylized violence, much menace and an implied sexual encounter. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-II — adults and adolescents. Not rated by the Motion Picture Association.

Saturday, Sept. 19, 8-10:05 p.m. EDT (HBO) "The Invisible Man" (2020). Shortly after escaping her maniacally possessive live-in boyfriend (Oliver Jackson-Cohen), a cutting-edge optics researcher, a former architect (fervent Elisabeth Moss) learns that he has killed himself and left her a sizable portion of his vast wealth. But a series of unsettling events soon convinces her that he faked his death and is somehow stalking her, even though she can't see him. Understandably, both her sister (Harriet Dyer), who aided her getaway, and the childhood friend (Aldis Hodge), in whose home she has taken refuge, refuse to accept this outlandish idea and, with her former lover apparently intent on ruining her life, her plight becomes increasingly desperate. Though far more intelligent than many thrillers, writer-director Leigh Whannell's remarkably absorbing monster movie, which bears only a very distant relationship to H.G. Wells' 1897 novel, includes intense bloodletting while its conclusion appeals to viewers' basest instincts. Only the gulf separating the film's sci-fi scenario from anything in the real world makes it acceptable for a small band of grown-ups. Much gory violence, including gunplay, vigilantism and vengeance themes, cohabitation, at least one use of profanity, about a half-dozen rough terms, fleeting crude and crass language. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was L — limited adult audience, films whose problematic content many adults would find troubling. The Motion Picture Association rating was R — restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.