NEW YORK (CNS) — The following are capsule reviews of theatrical movies on network and cable television the week of Sept. 6. Please note that televised versions may or may not be edited for language, nudity, violence and sexual situations.

Sunday, Sept. 6, noon-1:45 p.m. EDT (TCM) "The Enchanted Cottage" (1945). Fragile romantic fantasy about a disfigured World War II veteran (Robert Young) and a plain-looking maid (Dorothy McGuire), each of whom sees the beauty of the other through the eyes of love. Directed by John Cromwell, the sentimentality is old-fashioned, but the theme of true love is universal. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-I — general patronage. Not rated by the Motion Picture Association.

Friday, Sept. 11, 7:10-9 p.m. EDT (Showtime) "Morning Glory" (2010). Generally likable light comedy about an enthusiastic television producer (Rachel McAdams) who gets her shot at the big time running a struggling morning show for a national network. Tasked with lifting ratings, she must mediate between clashing co-anchors (Harrison Ford and Diane Keaton) and convince one — a venerable reporter — that fluff is an acceptable substitute for hard news. In the process, she learns that balance is essential in her own life, though she also makes a morally unacceptable decision to bed down with a colleague (Patrick Wilson). Director Roger Michell leans heavily on the appeal of the talented McAdams, whose infectious smile lends the film a warm glow. Nongraphic sexual activity, an off-screen encounter, several uses of profanity, two instances of rough language, much crude and crass talk, numerous scatological and sexual references, a drug reference. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG-13 — parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

Saturday, Sept. 12, 12:15-4:15 p.m. EDT (AMC) "The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey" (2012). Epic adaptation of the opening part of Catholic author J.R.R. Tolkien's 1937 children's novel "The Hobbit, or There and Back Again," directed by Peter Jackson. In this first installment of a trio of prequels to Jackson's "The Lord of the Rings" trilogy, also based on Tolkien's fiction, a homebody hobbit (Martin Freeman) is reluctantly convinced by a wizard (Ian McKellen) to accompany and aid a group of dwarves (led by Richard Armitage) in their quest to recapture their ancient stronghold, a storehouse of fabulous wealth long ago conquered by a rampaging dragon. The heroism of ordinary people and the potential for everyday goodness to subdue evil are the primary themes of the long, combat-heavy adventure that follows. As the titular character proves his mettle, the corrupting effects of power are also showcased through his encounter with a cave dweller (Andy Serkis) who is obsessed with — and spiritually enslaved by — a magical ring. Not for the easily frightened or those with short attention spans, Jackson's sweeping journey across Tolkien's imaginary world of Middle-earth is an upbeat outing suitable for all others. Much bloodless action violence, some mild gross-out humor. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-II — adults and adolescents. The Motion Picture Association rating was PG-13 — parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

Saturday, Sept. 12, 8-10 p.m. EDT (TCM) "Out of the Past" (1947). Stylishly dark crime thriller in which a private eye (Robert Mitchum) is hired to find the double-crossing girlfriend (Jane Greer) of a big-time gambler (Kirk Douglas) but falls in love with her instead — until she double-crosses him on a murder rap. Director Jacques Tourneur keeps viewers off balance with a twisty plot that begins in a small town where the detective is hiding out until his sordid past catches up with him and he's forced to protect himself from his former associates. Stylized violence and romantic complications. The Catholic News Service classification of the theatrical version was A-II — adults and adolescents. Not rated by the Motion Picture Association.