Q — Advice is sought by a couple from Mumbai, India, on how to proceed with a wedding between a Catholic woman and a Hindu man, with both families committed to their religious traditions.
A — The question is a very sensitive one because it involves the human heart. Two people in love, one a Hindu and the other a Catholic, committed to their families’ religious traditions, and wondering how to proceed in marriage. At the level of church law and discipline, the issue is quite straightforward. The Catholic partner in a marriage with someone who is not a Catholic must make a solemn promise to do all that is possible to have the children baptized and brought up as Catholics. The non-Catholic partner does not have to make such a promise, but must be fully aware of the promise made. At a very basic level it makes sense to arrive at some agreed decisions about the religious nurture and upbringing of children. If no such decisions have been reached ahead of time, this may become quite a troubling issue.
In terms of advice I would make the following comments. 
1. Get in touch with a sympathetic and informed Catholic priest who will be able to assist in your preparations for marriage. This is not only about church rules and regulations, but also about families with their histories, traditions, memories and feelings.
2. Recognize that this will be a challenging process. In a sense you already recognize this given the question you are asking. After the wedding festivities are all over, and as children come along the question about what to do, about having the children baptized, about enabling them also to be aware of their Hindu family and religious inheritance — all become very important issues.
3. Realize that family members on both sides of the religious boundary will at times be hurt and experience conflicted feelings by the decisions and options you make. This seems unavoidable and calls for great sensitivity. So, seek opportunities for both families/traditions to come together, so that they will come know one another, learn about one another, trust one another.
Q — Advice is sought by a couple from Mumbai, India, on how to proceed with a wedding between a Catholic woman and a Hindu man, with both families committed to their religious traditions.

 
A — The question is a very sensitive one because it involves the human heart. Two people in love, one a Hindu and the other a Catholic, committed to their families’ religious traditions, and wondering how to proceed in marriage. At the level of church law and discipline, the issue is quite straightforward. The Catholic partner in a marriage with someone who is not a Catholic must make a solemn promise to do all that is possible to have the children baptized and brought up as Catholics. The non-Catholic partner does not have to make such a promise, but must be fully aware of the promise made. At a very basic level it makes sense to arrive at some agreed decisions about the religious nurture and upbringing of children. If no such decisions have been reached ahead of time, this may become quite a troubling issue.
In terms of advice I would make the following comments. 

 
1. Get in touch with a sympathetic and informed Catholic priest who will be able to assist in your preparations for marriage. This is not only about church rules and regulations, but also about families with their histories, traditions, memories and feelings.

 
2. Recognize that this will be a challenging process. In a sense you already recognize this given the question you are asking. After the wedding festivities are all over, and as children come along the question about what to do, about having the children baptized, about enabling them also to be aware of their Hindu family and religious inheritance — all become very important issues.

 
3. Realize that family members on both sides of the religious boundary will at times be hurt and experience conflicted feelings by the decisions and options you make. This seems unavoidable and calls for great sensitivity. So, seek opportunities for both families/traditions to come together, so that they will come know one another, learn about one another, trust one another.