Q — With the changes in the liturgy in progress, what is your opinion on changing a line in the Our Father? “Lead us not into temptation” seems to me to be archaic and misleading. As far as I know this is not included in the Scriptures – see Matthew 6:7-15: “Subject us not to the trial” and “Do not put us to the test but save us from the evil one” (or deliver us from evil).
A — Your question is a very good one indeed, and it indicates serious critical reflection is going on about matters of faith. 
As Henry James, the American novelist, once put it, “Every translation is a lie!” James meant that every translation is in some measure an interpretation. In our case every English translation is from the Greek New Testament, and, therefore, is in some measure an interpretation. 
There are two versions of the Lord’s prayer in the New Testament: Matthew 6:7-15; Luke 11:1-4. Both texts share the phrase that we now pray as “and lead us not into temptation.” The word for “temptation” in Greek is peirasmos. “Temptation” here probably does not mean only everyday temptations — the kind of temptations we all know about in our own daily lives — so much as the great trial/temptation at the end. 
Part of early Christian thinking was that before the end comes there would be a time of trial and temptation. This, for example, reflects the understanding of Revelation 3:10, the message to the church of Philadelphia: “Because you have kept my word of patient endurance, I will keep you from the hour of trial (peirasmos) which is coming on the whole world, to try those who dwell upon the earth.” It refers in terms of apocalyptic literature to the time of final cosmic crisis. We may also think of it with immediate reference to our own lives: “Help us as we muddle our way through our messy lives, and help us to be faithful right to the end.” “Lead us not” for us is not causal. It makes no sense to ask God to stop leading us into temptation! It is much better to understand it as “Preserve us from succumbing to the trials that inevitably will come our way and help us to remain faithful all the way through to the end.” 
My preference would be to retain the present translation that has been prayed down through the centuries but do a much better job in terms of religious education/catechesis.
Q — With the changes in the liturgy in progress, what is your opinion on changing a line in the Our Father? “Lead us not into temptation” seems to me to be archaic and misleading. As far as I know this is not included in the Scriptures – see Matthew 6:7-15: “Subject us not to the trial” and “Do not put us to the test but save us from the evil one” (or deliver us from evil).
 
A — Your question is a very good one indeed, and it indicates serious critical reflection is going on about matters of faith. 
As Henry James, the American novelist, once put it, “Every translation is a lie!” James meant that every translation is in some measure an interpretation. In our case every English translation is from the Greek New Testament, and, therefore, is in some measure an interpretation. 
There are two versions of the Lord’s prayer in the New Testament: Matthew 6:7-15; Luke 11:1-4. Both texts share the phrase that we now pray as “and lead us not into temptation.” The word for “temptation” in Greek is peirasmos. “Temptation” here probably does not mean only everyday temptations — the kind of temptations we all know about in our own daily lives — so much as the great trial/temptation at the end. 
Part of early Christian thinking was that before the end comes there would be a time of trial and temptation. This, for example, reflects the understanding of Revelation 3:10, the message to the church of Philadelphia: “Because you have kept my word of patient endurance, I will keep you from the hour of trial (peirasmos) which is coming on the whole world, to try those who dwell upon the earth.” It refers in terms of apocalyptic literature to the time of final cosmic crisis. We may also think of it with immediate reference to our own lives: “Help us as we muddle our way through our messy lives, and help us to be faithful right to the end.” “Lead us not” for us is not causal. It makes no sense to ask God to stop leading us into temptation! It is much better to understand it as “Preserve us from succumbing to the trials that inevitably will come our way and help us to remain faithful all the way through to the end.” 
My preference would be to retain the present translation that has been prayed down through the centuries but do a much better job in terms of religious education/catechesis.