Both this statue of George Washington on Sandy Boulevard, as well as the statue of Joan of Arc, were commissioned by a prominent physician, Henry Waldo Coe, in the 1920s. One could speculate that the doctor would approve of the statues’ pandemic-era additions. (Katie Scott/Catholic Sentinel)
Both this statue of George Washington on Sandy Boulevard, as well as the statue of Joan of Arc, were commissioned by a prominent physician, Henry Waldo Coe, in the 1920s. One could speculate that the doctor would approve of the statues’ pandemic-era additions. (Katie Scott/Catholic Sentinel)
The majestic Joan of Arc statue that stands in the traffic circle on Northeast Cesar Chavez Boulevard and Glisan Street in Portland is showing some French patriotism and pandemic prudence. It is unclear who masked the replica of the 15th-century saint, but a French-flag mouth and nose covering has remained in place since at least mid-April.

The statue depicts the teenage warrior who led the French Army to defeat the British during the Hundred Years’ War. In 1924, this replica of a Parisian statue was given to the City of Portland by prominent physician Henry Waldo Coe. It was a tribute to American soldiers who died on French soil during World War I.

Coe also commissioned the George Washington statue on Sandy Boulevard, which naturally has been sporting an American flag-style mask.