Gerry Osacho, Lisa Stiller and Karolina Stepkowski Newcombe hold a vigil in Beaverton to speak up for a nonviolent resolution in Iran. (Courtesy Lisa Stiller)
Gerry Osacho, Lisa Stiller and Karolina Stepkowski Newcombe hold a vigil in Beaverton to speak up for a nonviolent resolution in Iran. (Courtesy Lisa Stiller)
Threats of violence made news last month in Oregon and the world. It’s time to recall that Jesus and the church in large part prohibit the use of force.

State Sen. Brian Boquist, one of the Oregon Republicans in hiding to thwart a vote on a climate bill, reacted alarmingly to news that state troopers may try to get him and his colleagues back to the people’s business. He warned that any officers sent to retrieve him had better be heavily armed and bachelors. He has not recanted this threat of attack.

The senator can lie low but not foment violence. Predictably, his rant set off a social media eruption of paranoid anti-government thugs who called for even more killing. Poorly done, senator.

By contrast, President Trump lived out Catholic social teaching for a moment when he called off a planned military strike on Iran. Echoing Catholic thought, he declared the deadly strike a “disproportionate” response to the original offense, the downing of an unmanned drone. Well done, Mr. President.

We take what Jesus said seriously, even when it’s hard to carry out. Meeting hate with love and violence with a defenseless cheek may not win elections, but it will add a little more divine will to the world.