People in Louisville, Ky., participate in the "Walking Together: Pilgrimage for Racial Justice" Oct. 16, 2021. The event included a pilgrimage from the Cathedral of the Assumption to Presentation Academy, where the 150 or so participants listened to a panel of members of the Sisters of Charity of Nazareth, Ky., discuss the congregation's "own pilgrimage" -- from its early years as a slaveholder to its efforts today for racial justice. (CNS photo/Ruby Thomas, The Record)
People in Louisville, Ky., participate in the "Walking Together: Pilgrimage for Racial Justice" Oct. 16, 2021. The event included a pilgrimage from the Cathedral of the Assumption to Presentation Academy, where the 150 or so participants listened to a panel of members of the Sisters of Charity of Nazareth, Ky., discuss the congregation's "own pilgrimage" -- from its early years as a slaveholder to its efforts today for racial justice. (CNS photo/Ruby Thomas, The Record)
Regarding “We’ve been too quiet,” May 20, Page 23:

Thank you for your fine editorial summarizing what you learned from your study and discussions of racism at St. Ignatius. I hope that your challenge will generate similar initiatives in other parishes that could help us overcome the ”virus of indifference” that Pope Francis laments in his recent book “Let Us Dream.”

The ongoing synodal process in our archdiocese and the “observe, judge, act” framework Pope Francis recommends as part of this process provide a great opportunity for such discussion and potential action as we listen to each other and walk together.

Bruce Weber

Corvallis