A large caravan of migrants from Central America, trying to reach the U.S., walk along a road Oct. 21 in Hidalgo, Mexico. (CNS photo/Adrees Latif, Reuters)
A large caravan of migrants from Central America, trying to reach the U.S., walk along a road Oct. 21 in Hidalgo, Mexico. (CNS photo/Adrees Latif, Reuters)

Regarding “Immigration a moral matter, not a legal one,” Sept. 7, Page 5:

The United States can hardly be faulted for lack of generosity to the people of other countries and even to illegal immigrants. However, there is a limit. If we love our country and want to preserve our way of life for ourselves and our children, though, how is this immoral? 

Especially forceful are stories of refugees fleeing for their lives. However, “hard cases make bad law.” 

We should not be luring good and brave people from other countries to run these terrible risks and disappointments. Besides that, when we are practically at the breaking point politically, culturally and fiscally, should we be taking on further difficulties?

The truly compassionate thing, and therefore the moral thing to do is to be let it be known everywhere that the southern border is firmly closed and those here illegally will be deported. As harsh as this may seem at first glance, it is far less harsh than the personal, political, cultural and fiscal disintegration and chaos that otherwise unfold. It is putting law at the service of the common good, which has always been the lodestar of Catholic social teaching.

Lee Gilbert

Portland